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zero applicants for jobs, whole departments empty

Discussion in 'Education news' started by dunnocks, Jul 5, 2019.

  1. a1976

    a1976 Occasional commenter

    OMG, I think I know this school. There is one interesting chap who is a Maths teacher but somehow, could not get a A-Level in Maths and has never been near a university. However, he has managed to worm his way into the SLT. I don't get it.
     
    agathamorse and ATfan like this.
  2. a1976

    a1976 Occasional commenter

    Too right!! No matter what government is in charge, over the last several years schools have become places that are more or less societies who are staffed with insecure young people who seem to be too afraid to grow up and leave schools behind, so they become teachers and...too many of them fail.
     
  3. a1976

    a1976 Occasional commenter

    But how different would it be under Labour, or Lib Dem? Children will have even more so-called "rights". More "social" lessons and more centralisation.
     
  4. a1976

    a1976 Occasional commenter

    I think part of the problem is that too many people are not taking the 'hard subjects' anymore. There are too many taking Media Studies, Sociology, etc etc and not enough courses that actually lead to real job creation and abilities.
     
  5. phlogiston

    phlogiston Star commenter

    What "rights" do you fear children having?
    Since I started teaching they have not gained many "rights". They cannot be beaten, they have a right to a broad and balanced curriculum. I'm not aware that they have more "social" lessons than they used to.
    Of course, in many schools they've lost the right to study subjects like music, art and drama.
    How can we be more centralised than at the moment?

    Why do you think that? Sociology is not taught below year 12 in most schools I know of. Media studies is a minority subject.
    In 2018 just over 700000 students took GCSE maths, 45000 took media at GCSE.
    At A level, more students took history or geography rather than media or sociology.
    One problem is that A level sciences have become sufficiently more difficult that we will probably see a drop in numbers as marginal candidates realise the chance of good grades is lower.
     
  6. bessiesmith

    bessiesmith Occasional commenter

    Which children don't matter?
     
    PGCE_tutor and ajrowing like this.
  7. a1976

    a1976 Occasional commenter

    Well let's see, shall we. I think a 13 or 14 (or older) being allowed to swear at me and call me a fu88*** C*** on grounds of "it's freedom of speech". I've heard that a lot. Where I taught at for nearly eight years, there was a headteacher who would not punish or exclude anyone who vandalised school property because his view was that "It's their school". Also, one teacher who I was standing next to during breaktime had a bottle thrown at her by a pupil and I saw that it was intentional and so did she. But, the response was "It's their breaktime, so they should be allowed to have fun".
     
    anenome2, tonymars and agathamorse like this.
  8. a1976

    a1976 Occasional commenter

    Every child matters because this why we are in the "profession" (or I was) to begin with. However, I think the philosophy should be extended to "everyone matters" who is a part of the school community, and beyond. Their safety and wellbeing should matter, but when staff suffer violent attacks (any attacks at the hands of anyone on school grounds) it should be dealt with. Sadly, it not dealt with a lot of the time.
     
  9. JohnJCazorla

    JohnJCazorla Star commenter

    I can't begin to imagine the question to which the answer is Boris. Especially in education.

    Then again I can't see Jeremy Hunt being an answer either. :(
     
  10. phlogiston

    phlogiston Star commenter

    They're not "rights". They're a combination of poor parenting and a school scared of setting boundaries. This has nothing to do with which Government may or may not be elected which is how this particular strand started.
     
  11. SEBREGIS

    SEBREGIS Lead commenter

    I think there's a big split developing in education. You have good schools, which teachers refuse to leave because - well, why would you? And you have a second grade of school which just burns out teachers at an alarming rate. And once a school gets that reputation, its no wonder people don't want to apply.

    Its easy to get into a craap school, its incredibly hard to get into a good one. Which is a shame for students in both places. From what I've seen (and I saw a LOT of schools doing general supply for a while) the teachers in good schools are often complaisant, and the teachers in many bad schools are extraordinarily good but fed up and leaving.

    In either case, we're not developing talent.

    Maybe the solution is to collectivise education and allocate teachers short term roles, the same way we deploy soldiers? So everyone has to take a turn working in a dire school (but with excellent support and resources) after which they get transferred to a less 'active battle' front to recharge. Maybe we could actually have one term each two years where you go back to college? The French do something a bit similar and it seems to work for them.
     
  12. averagedan

    averagedan Occasional commenter

    8 teachers resigning at once?? I find myself feeling rather sceptical at this claim. It would have made the educational news somewhere.....

    In my experience it gets to two in a science department and SLT start handing out R&Rs and TLRs for being milk board monitor and persuade people to stay.....Essentially bribing people as far as is necessary.
     
  13. phlogiston

    phlogiston Star commenter

    I believe this used to happen in France and Australia. Back in the 80s, some UK LEAs would appoint primary staff to a "pool". This was always an application of last resort for teachers.
    When secondary education was reorganised in Colchester in the mid-eighties, some teachers had the prospect of redeployment. I redeployed myself to a different LEA.
     
    sabrinakat and (deleted member) like this.
  14. SEBREGIS

    SEBREGIS Lead commenter

    These days? I doubt that. Its not hard to find a new job and there's always the possibility that things might be better. I think Bob said it best:

     
    Mrsmumbles likes this.
  15. bessiesmith

    bessiesmith Occasional commenter

    Yes, I have seen this done in other countries. Advantages: you don't get ghetto schools where teachers feel trapped and no-one would choose to work there if they could help it. Disadvantages: the geographical area of an LA can be very large and you could suddenly find yourself with 90 minute daily commute.
    Now we have MATs rather than LAs this would be even less workable as the MAT might be spread over several LAs.
     
  16. averagedan

    averagedan Occasional commenter

    The thing that convinces me this isn't true is that all 8 left and no-one was bribed into staying. In science that's rare. It's not unusual for a 5K bribe to be handed out to scientists & mathematicians at the moment in my area. 8 people resigning just doesn't sound believable.... There's always one person looking for a TLR, etc.
     
  17. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    Well...Davey Cambo always said that he thought Gove was a bit of a Maoist...ie, destroy and demoralise and wreck everything in the deluded belief that the Brave New Glorious People’s Rebuild would be soooooo much better. Liam Nolan, anyone?
     
    eljefeb90 likes this.
  18. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    Tory boys.
     
  19. Mrsmumbles

    Mrsmumbles Star commenter

    A noble idea, but who would want to enter No-Man’s Land?
     
  20. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    Not a unique situation. I recall some years back a local school where the HT decided to 'put his foot down' over some issues in one dept (PE). The HoD resigned followed by the rest of the department. Also a few years ago now I went on a science CPD day and sat next to a chap who was an HT at a school in the same LEA. He wasn't a science teacher and when I asked why he was there he said that his school (a large comp in the middle of Brum) didn't have any science teachers. Later he offered me a job! Both these examples happened long before we had the current crisis.
     
    phlogiston and agathamorse like this.

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