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Yr 4 Data Handling Interview Lesson

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by ejflin1983, Apr 21, 2012.

  1. Hello there,

    I have an interview for the KS2 teaching job and have been asked to teach a 30min lesson to yr 4 class (30 kids- mixed ability). I was thinking of teaching an aspects of Data Handling, as in the last OFSTED report the school has been asked to improve children's skills in extracting and explaining information from graphs and charts.

    I have an idea for the lesson but I am not sure if it is not too 'boring' just normal and I really want to impress the panel. I want the lesson to have that WOW effect as I really want that job:).

    I am considering to deliver a session on reading and interpreting data from a bar chart. Aspects which I want to include are: recap on prior knowledge, engaging starter, main teaching and plenary (or mini plenaries). I need to show opportunities for AfL and as I don't know the children I need to think of an appropriate way of differentiation.

    I know there is quite a lot but please HELP!
     
  2. Hello there,

    I have an interview for the KS2 teaching job and have been asked to teach a 30min lesson to yr 4 class (30 kids- mixed ability). I was thinking of teaching an aspects of Data Handling, as in the last OFSTED report the school has been asked to improve children's skills in extracting and explaining information from graphs and charts.

    I have an idea for the lesson but I am not sure if it is not too 'boring' just normal and I really want to impress the panel. I want the lesson to have that WOW effect as I really want that job:).

    I am considering to deliver a session on reading and interpreting data from a bar chart. Aspects which I want to include are: recap on prior knowledge, engaging starter, main teaching and plenary (or mini plenaries). I need to show opportunities for AfL and as I don't know the children I need to think of an appropriate way of differentiation.

    I know there is quite a lot but please HELP!
     
  3. bombaysapphire

    bombaysapphire Star commenter

    Would multiple bar charts be appropriate differentiation for Year 4? Not sure as I am secondary but I would guess that the bright ones would cope.
    I have to say that reading a bar chart doesn't sound wildly exciting but it is good that you have picked up an area that the school need to develop.
     
  4. Thank you for your advice.

    Well that's the thing I know it's not too exciting but on the other hand maybe I could make it more interesting by creating a bar chart with something the kids might be interested in. I am afraid that multiple bar charts might be above their ability. Though I was thinking about it and thought that I could use the same graph for all of the kids but have different questions to differentiate the task. What do you think?
     
  5. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    What do I think?
    I think I'd like to understand what sort of system we have that means 9 year olds are wasting their time with bar charts when I keep seeing 16 year olds who can barely add up and can't reliably multiply by 10.
    In fact, I cannot help but believe that the reason I see so many 16 year olds who can't add up or multiply by 10 is entirely because they spent too much time when they were 9 not learning those basics.
    That's what I think.
    Sorry it doesn't help you with your lesson much.
     
  6. bombaysapphire

    bombaysapphire Star commenter

    It would be a bit contrived but could you have different bar charts about something that would differ by country (favourite foods?) and the children could try and guess which country the children asked for each bar chart come from.
    Different questions would be one way to differentiate it. It would be hard to differentiate it much though. I would go with another more complicated bar chart.
    (I agree with you PaulDG but it isn't something the OP can fix at this stage!)
     
  7. As a starter you could get the pupils to create a bar chart practically using multilink. they could each have a multilink or similar to represent them. then depending on the topic , favourite colour, sport etc, they could put their block in the correct place. This would help the understanding of what a bar chart shows you could then question them about how many people the bar chart represents, how many more is one column than another etc, this would bring in some of the basic numeracy skills that pauldg was concerned about.
    As a main activity you should definitely use bar charts that interest the pupils. I also like the idea of using bar charts from different countries as you could bring a bit of citizenship and pse into it. you could also bring in healthy eating etc.
    Good luck
     

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