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Your experiences of coaches in primary PE

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Bevi1, Apr 11, 2016.

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  1. Bevi1

    Bevi1 New commenter

    Hi, I would be interested in finding out abo teachers' experiences of the use of coaches as trainers in primary PE, both good or bad. It would be useful to know how effective the experience was, how it impacted on your practice and your views on alternative options.
     
  2. SportyK

    SportyK Occasional commenter

    All depends on who you know. We use coaches for termly P.E. focused days. We also use 6th form students from local High Schools as sports leaders under teacher supervision. Our teachers use the C2C Alliance SOW which as really advanced our P.E. curriculum and teachers' knowledge.

    Recommended companies we work with: Rugger Rats, S7 Soccer Academy, Cricket Asylum, Skip2Bfit.
    These companies also helped train up our Teachers and Y6's with help from myself to run break-time activities.

    At present we don't use full-time coaches for P.E.
     
  3. Bevi1

    Bevi1 New commenter

    I'd be really interested to talk to teachers about their views on the experience of training alongside those companies- both good and bad.
     
  4. SportyK

    SportyK Occasional commenter

    Our experience has been extremely positive - these are experts in their field and have boosted our teachers' knowledge, confidence and skills. We do our research first before bringing outside companies in. :)
     
    Bevi1 likes this.
  5. whitestag

    whitestag Senior commenter

    I'm bored stiff watching their lessons. Give me a pair of trainers, a basketball and I can take care of PE myself. I'd rather spend the money on a few extra sets of books for my class.
     
    Bevi1 likes this.
  6. SportyK

    SportyK Occasional commenter

    Ha ha, go for it MJ! It's a shame plenty of primary teachers are scared stiff teaching PE though.
     
  7. CarrieV

    CarrieV Lead commenter

    What's there to be scared of?
    You hit a ball, kick a ball or run after a ball ( and sometimes there isn't even a ball!)

    Job done!
     
  8. SportyK

    SportyK Occasional commenter

    I agree to an extent, but do you think 6 hours training on a PGCE course enables us to teach PE effectively? I get staff asking me all the time about how to teach PE effectively. Not that I always know the answer mind.
     
  9. CarrieV

    CarrieV Lead commenter

    Our NQTs have a term of PE CPD when they start which develops their confidence to begin with, i think this certainly helps! ( I had an hour in a gym which masqueraded as PE training on my PGCE!)
     
  10. redlamp2

    redlamp2 Occasional commenter

    Easy to say while sat in a nice comfy chair, tapping away on a keyboard.

    Once it comes to doing it with some ten year olds who recognise somebody clueless about sport and with the coordination of a two legged donkey, it's a little trickier.

    More to the point it's a disservice to kids to not give them a chance to love and understand sport by being coached by those capable of doing so. Obviously if you're the only option then you do your best. But if you haven't a clue and there are others available who do... leave it to them.
     
    Bevi1 and SportyK like this.
  11. CarrieV

    CarrieV Lead commenter

    Apart from sitting in a nice comfy chair, I also stand on a hockey pitch, netball court, rugby field, cricket pitch, tennis court and swimming pool!
    We have a minimum of 12 hours of PE training a year, and I take PE teaching as seriously as I take maths and english. If I felt I "hadn't a clue" then I would bloody well do something about it!
     
    Bevi1 likes this.
  12. SportyK

    SportyK Occasional commenter

    Spot on. I co-ordinate PE at my Junior School @redlamp2, I am a qualified cricket coach and personal trainer. I bring in coaches who can offer specialism in sports that I and our staff are less confident with. This in turn improves our skills when they deliver CPD to us. A good and enthusiastic coach/teacher can make all the difference to children's view of PE and identify true talent!

    @CarrieV, you're obviously confident in what you do which is fab for your children but, there are plenty of teachers who would readily admit to not having a clue. Ask teachers about maths or literacy and it's fine, ask them about subject knowledge in PE and it isn't the same.
     
  13. CarrieV

    CarrieV Lead commenter

    I agree, but there is no excuse to remain that way. There are plenty of opportunities to improve on coaching skills, much of it in our area provided as part of our Schools Sports Partnership ( which still runs here albeit in a more "privatised" form. They run coaching courses in a whole host of sports and there are always opportunities for development ( lacrosse was fun!).
     
    Bevi1 and SportyK like this.
  14. SportyK

    SportyK Occasional commenter

    I'd be interested in asking both @redlamp2 and @CarrieV how you plan for competitions etc. At present our school is in a fledgling phase in terms of developing strong squads for sports so when we come up against other schools we tend to struggle. How do you plan long-term for development? For example I'm running cricket weekly but can't personally teach football after school and rugby as well. Do you phase in sports per-term or have other strategies as well?
     
  15. CarrieV

    CarrieV Lead commenter

    Having mixed age classes of 15 means we struggle to find a squad for anything! Generally, if you want to represent the school, you do!
    We have two after school clubs run by the School Sport Partnership organisers, we vary the clubs depending on the competition timetable, I run another club,a TA runs a fourth. That's the best we can do with the limited number of staff we have!
     
    SportyK likes this.
  16. SportyK

    SportyK Occasional commenter

    Thanks @CarrieV Good use of resources. I felt for my pupils this week, we competed in a cross-country event with an average of 30 runners per year group. We had one child in the top 5 and some in the top ten. Other schools had children regularly in the top 3 and representing area/county. I had to read a post on another school site to find out that if a child finished in the top 5 that they would trial for the area. This hasn't been communicated to me by the organisers. So I've emailed them to find out. It seems like who you know benefits the kids not necessarily what you know.
     
  17. redlamp2

    redlamp2 Occasional commenter

    I see lots of people standing on sports pitches. Doesn't make them any good ;)

    Given your apparent experience I'm surprised at your earlier response. It's perfectly understandable why there are many teachers 'scared' of teaching sport - in part because they were taught by people who didn't have a clue, didn't care or thought they knew it all because they turned out once or twice for Little Bobbingham 4th Team.

    In terms of developing squads for competitions your best bet is developing close links with local clubs.
     
  18. SportyK

    SportyK Occasional commenter

    This is certainly beneficial, it works with sports I have played myself because I know the familiar faces etc...
     
  19. lardylady

    lardylady Star commenter

    When I was at school in Y5 (back in 1977) every single PE lesson consisted of the teacher chucking a ball at us which we had to dodge. Now I could certainly do that, but for some reason those sorts of PE lessons are frowned upon these days. We have a 'sport expert' who works one day a week at our school and over the course of a year, each teacher has two half terms of working under his guidance. We share the teaching and planning and it has certainly made me more confident about teaching PE, but I would still prefer just to be able to chuck a ball at the kids.
     
    Bevi1 likes this.
  20. CarrieV

    CarrieV Lead commenter

    We just call it Dodgeball and off we go!
     

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