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Your class time-table

Discussion in 'Primary' started by GreenHippo, Jun 12, 2011.

  1. I am curious how schools/teachers may differ in their allocation of time per subject. How many hours do you allocate to which subject areas across a week, and what year group(s) do you teach? Do you decide how long to allocate to which area, or does your head stipulate/influence this?
    Also, is your time-table rigidly planned, and do you stick to the structure each day/week, or are you more fluid? Does anyone go "off time-table" for a themed week - or do you just theme all of the lessons in your time-table to match the topic?
    Many thanks

     
  2. I'm in Year 3:

    Mornings:
    4 hour-long maths lessons a week + mental maths/times tables whenever I have 5/10mins to spare.
    4 hour literacy lessons (Year literacy strategy 3 units) + 1 lesson banded spelling and handwriting.
    Afternoons:
    Much, much more flexible. Don't really have a timetable. That's because different subjects need our timetabled hall, outdoor learning area and computer suite slots, so we have to swap around. Also sometimes we like to get the children from both year 3 classes together for one activity or another, so that depends on what suits the other class, and other times the children get on so well with something I let it run to a double-session so that then changes the daily plan.
    I plan per term based on 2 hours of science per week; 2 hours or either geography or history (swapping at half term) 1 hour of art, 1hour R.E. and 1 hour P.E; 2 hours of Welsh (I'm in Wales) and 1 hour of music. D&T we do at the end of each term in a block of 5 whole afternoons doing a project.
    PSE and ICT are covered cross-curricularly in other subjects.
    The weekly average time allocation of 4-5hours of English and Maths; hour of P.E. and 2+hours of science and Welsh is set by the head. She leaves the other subjects up to us. The history/geography swap and D+T project is my own choice.
    Hope this helps!
     
  3. It does help - thank you Visco!
     
  4. We have to hand in a timetable with medium term planning at the beginning of each term, and we are expected to stick to it quite rigidly. It has to show intervention/support groups and use of the TA at any given time, as well as subject allocations.
    I really hate the rigidity of it: there's no scope for moving P.E. because of the weather, or doing a whole afternoon of one subject because the kids have really got into it. I also used to block subjects together at my previous school which workd really well - so the whole DT unit, for example, might be taught over 3 days. I can't do that at my present school, and it just seems to drag everyhing out to the point where the kids and I are losing interest in a topic by the end. Short, sharp blocks are far more engagin, in my opinion.
    In terms of time for each subject, we're given a list by the headteacher. We can't physically fit in everything we are supposed to do, so there's a sort of rotation of which subject gets the shortfall. It's strictly Literacy and Numeracy every morning, though, for an hour each, with a 20 minute guided reading slot in there too. Everything else is squashed into the afternoons.


     
  5. Thank you Elizabeth, very interesting.
     

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