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Young Enterprise club!!

Discussion in 'Business studies' started by joanneb3ll, Jul 31, 2011.

  1. I am starting my NQT year in September and my department has asked me to co-ordinate the Enterprise club (year 7 and 8).

    I want to make a good first impression but I am struggling for ideas. I just wondered if anyone runs a Young Enterprise club at their school and could suggest ideas?

    Jo :)
     
  2. I am starting my NQT year in September and my department has asked me to co-ordinate the Enterprise club (year 7 and 8).

    I want to make a good first impression but I am struggling for ideas. I just wondered if anyone runs a Young Enterprise club at their school and could suggest ideas?

    Jo :)
     
  3. cement

    cement New commenter

    Keep it relatively simple. Make good use of some of the resources you've already got at the school. Make & Bake Day using Food Tech, Pencil Case stitching using textiles, or anything else you've got in the school you can use. Young Enterprise is a guaranteed way of wasting your time where you end up doing all the work and everybody else ends up getting all the credit!
     
  4. Hiyah
    Ideas to try - a smoothie bar, students do the research, create a questionnaire find out what flavours kids would like - then have a focus group tasting session. Once you have narrowed it down to 2/3 flavours, divide into two or three teams and they have to come up with a brand name, a promotion and compete for the most profit. I had three groups did this and they baked cakes (at home) and gave away as a free with their smoothie. Some did a buy one get one half price and the other group went for table and chairs with nibbles. I was able to get a term out of this with the actual selling of smoothies as the finale.
    Online shops sell smoothie cups and lids - although you can get them from COSTCO (your school should have an account). http://www.partyplastics.co.uk/shop/displayProducts.asp?action=productCategory&searchVal=68 I have used this company three times.
    You will need to buy some taster cups for the focus group - they should design a responses form to get the data down from those that come in to taste (suggest inviting a select few who get a proper VIP invite).
    You need to get permissions first before you start this, "they" may say no to all of it, some of it, be prepared for dissapointment, BUT don't give up. One year they said no to smoothie but yes to Shloer. Make sure any food they bring in has no nuts (we had some drama with some brownies).
    They have to get a float of money, buy the drinks, take off the cost of the cups, usually have enough left for a pizza lunch one day. I was given a "pot" of £100 for my enterprise, don't try and do it without a budget. I use it to start up ice cream stalls, tuck shops etc but I always put back £100 at the end and any profit the kids spend on pizza. (start-up capital).
    So
    1) Get a budget (won't work without it) stick your feet down and insist
    2) Get permissions in writing (often some mind changing half way through and you get stuck telling a room full of kids that their hard work has been a waste of time)
    3) Get kids on board from the start, allocate roles, get parents on board too if you can. Phone round parents of those kids that have signed up so they don't drop out.
    4) Make the rules clear at the start, what will get them kicked out e.g. don't turn up twice and you are fired etc.
    5) Get a senior member of SMT (SLT) to be your liason on projects - handing out trophys, someone to whinge to when the kids are playing up. The kids won't know you when you start so you need a bruiser who has been there 14 years that will strike fear into them when you need to regain order. Find out who this is and nail them to an agreement
    6) Keep records, names, dates, times, amounts, data data data. A Papertrail is awesome when 50p goes missing.
    7) Get a nice room with lots of resources, preferably an ICT room so you can print out questionnaires and posters etc.
    8) Take it slow don't be in a rush to blow all your good ideas and resources in the first club.
    Good luck. Anything else mail me direct sarah revisionstation.co.uk or @revisionstation
     
  5. You could do a mini Dragons-Den or Junior Apprentice - take some of the ideas from the series, eg. the one where they have to create a product and sell it to retailers (you could use other teachers or A level business students to act as the retailers - you could also ask the A level students to mentor the young ones, that would look good in their UCAS reference and their CV too). Get other departments to help you too, eg. create MFL snap cards that they could then be used by teachers or in local primary cluster schools. The kids would most likely love to go back to their former primary and use their snap cards with year 6 for an hour or two. Otherwise, gets Science to help you with creating some energy saving device (look at the Carbon Trust site for ideas). In my local Asda, I saw a book of healthy recipes that were written by a local primary after-school club, they had featured favourite recipe help from local 'known' business people but you could use the idea to feature fav recipes from management and teachers then see if you can sell the book in school. Hope this helps. In fact, I might use some of my own ideas with my year 10 and 11 this year!
     

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