1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Yet another Meeting not on calendar...

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by paperbin, Nov 12, 2018.

  1. 8sycamore

    8sycamore Occasional commenter

    It might be nice if it was in the working day. Perhaps the OP is like me, and others no doubt, who would prefer to spend time with their families at the end of the working day.
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  2. Piranha

    Piranha Star commenter

    There is nothing at all in STPCD to say that all directed time should be in the calendar from the start of the school year. Indeed, even the NUT sample calendars include contingency time for "emergencies and unplanned events". See https://www.teachers.org.uk/files/Workload-A5-7037.pdf pages 9 and 10. The only rule in STPCD is that the limit is 1265 hours. If the OP's school does not use STPCD, then even that does not apply.

    Of course, this and other events might take total directed time above the limit, in which case staff should do something about it via their unions. If not, failing to attend without a good reason would be a breach of contract.
     
    strawbs likes this.
  3. IanG

    IanG Occasional commenter

    I always thought that award evenings were a bit of a grey area for directed time and as others have said if this has been dropped in at the last minute then the school must expect that some staff cannot make it because of prior commitments....
     
    agathamorse and strawbs like this.
  4. FrankWolley

    FrankWolley Star commenter


    If a school adds a meeting outside school time which is not on any calendar they cannot expect 100% attendance, esp. if only short notice is given.

    How on earth can that be a breach if contract?
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  5. Piranha

    Piranha Star commenter

    I have added the bold to what I said before to emphasise it. The suggestion has been made that attendance is optional, but this is against STPCD and it would indeed be breaching ones contract, if it is based on STPCD, not to attend. However, I think most schools would accept that, if the notice given is very short, some people would have a good reason to not attend.
     
  6. FrankWolley

    FrankWolley Star commenter


    Not just 'very short' - in many places one has to wait 2 or more weeks for a GP appointment, and longer for a dental or hospital one. Then equally one could have family or other commitments.

    Quite frankly any meeting added in at less than a term's notice can only be optional. And no-one should have to explain their absence or beg to their HT for permission not to attend.
     
    blazer and agathamorse like this.
  7. Piranha

    Piranha Star commenter

    That is a view - just not what teachers' contracts say. It even appears to contradict NUT advice on directed time calendars. I agree that sometimes things, such as appointments, are arranged well in advance and can't easily be changed, and think these do make a good reason not to attend. What I don't agree with is the idea that teachers should be able to refuse to do something in their contracts without a good reason.

    Having spent most of my working life outside teaching, the idea that I need three months' notice of something outside my usual working hours seems crazy. Perhaps the routine of schools makes people a little inflexible.
     
  8. hammie

    hammie Lead commenter

    Sadly with 5 meetings already planned in this fortnight, I had to accept the only appointment available on this particular evening. Doctor, optometrist, car, boiler repair.....
    Its odd isn't it how being told attendance is compulsory will result in less people attending than if they asked nicely and offered something in exchange. (and no I don't mean another packet of cheap donuts)
     
    Piranha, FrankWolley and agathamorse like this.
  9. FrankWolley

    FrankWolley Star commenter

    It's funny how so many HTs expect teachers to behave like 'professionals' when it suits them ( run this extracurricular activity, attend this short notice meeting on the calendar etc) but then want little automata prepared to follow every dictat, however stupid or petty ( use x colours when marking , double mark, adopt this or that type of lesson plan according to which way the wind is blowing etc).;)
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  10. Jolly_Roger15

    Jolly_Roger15 Star commenter

    if this is some sort of presentation evening to which parents are invited, they too will have difficulty re-arranging their schedules at short notice.
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  11. peakster

    peakster Star commenter

    We have a presentation evening in October and another one at the end of the academic year.

    They used to be compulsory and caused much moaning.

    Now they are "optional"

    So explain the fact that virtually all the staff turned up for the October one even though it was an "extra"
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  12. shevington

    shevington Occasional commenter

    We assume they all claimed their travel expenses if they went home and came back for this meeting ? I suspect not.
     
  13. Jolly_Roger15

    Jolly_Roger15 Star commenter

    Two reasons come to mind.

    1. The psychological difference between being asked and told. (A winner for the SMT, as it allows them to staff extra curricular events outside the time budget, as they are 'optional')

    2. It gives the bum-lickers another opportunity to grovel conspicuously .
     
    Piranha and agathamorse like this.
  14. Catjellycat

    Catjellycat Occasional commenter

    I can only suspect the organisers are not single parents/parents whose partners work shifts. You find out-of-hours childcare at that short notice.

    What a crock.
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  15. Piranha

    Piranha Star commenter

    We had a Head of Year who made it perfectly clear that a social event for parents of Year 7 was optional for staff. We all turned up, even without getting anything in return. When she was replaced, the new one made it compulsory, and people started finding excuses.

    Sadly, it was within our directed time allowance, so they could tell us to go, but even if it hadn't been, I would have gone for the first Head of Year because she asked nicely and did her best for her staff.
     
    agathamorse likes this.
  16. Betterreadthandead

    Betterreadthandead New commenter

    Why don't they do this at the leavers assembly?
     
  17. Betterreadthandead

    Betterreadthandead New commenter

    ...this isn't even an important event!
     
  18. daisy1603

    daisy1603 Occasional commenter

    We’ve just been told we are expected to attend an evening tomorrow that originally was only for heads of department/GCSE option subjects.
    How do these people just expect us to drop everything and go??! I’m sure if I said I wouldn’t be there I’d be in the dog house.
     

Share This Page