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Yet another academy disgrace.

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Duke of York, Mar 26, 2016.

  1. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-35890448

    "An academy and free school trust praised by the Prime Minister has paid its chief executive a second salary passed through two separate companies, a government report says.

    It raises serious concerns about financial management and governance at Perry Beeches Academy Trust.

    The trust has been issued with a financial notice to improve following a probe prompted by a whistleblower.

    The trust, which runs five secondary schools in Birmingham, and has been praised by senior government ministers, has been ordered to improve financial management and governance.

    The Education Funding Agency investigation followed whistleblower allegations that the trust's chief executive, Liam Nolan, was paid an additional salary through a supply company, Nexus Schools Ltd.

    The findings confirmed the trust paid £1.2m over two years to Nexus, which then passed some of the money to Mr Nolan through a company of which he was sole director.

    There was no written contract for the payment and no alternative tenders for the services were considered, said the report.


    "The trust pays Nexus for providing the services of a CEO for Perry Beeches multi academy trust.

    "Nexus then sub contracts this role to Liam Nolan Ltd," says the report.

    These payments, of at least £160,000 over two years, were not disclosed in financial statements, it says.

    They are on top of Mr Nolan's annual payroll salary of £120,000 for his executive head teacher role
    "

    So we need more of these academies, do we?
     
    delnon, InkyP and robyn_banned_again like this.
  2. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Are academies obliged to state how much is spent on each child in a year, with rigorously-scrutinised evidence to prove the truth of their claims?
     
  3. racroesus

    racroesus Star commenter

    I don't think it matters how much is spent when the profits come from where it is spent.
     
  4. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    The thing that gets me, is that but for the whistleblower, the investigation would never have taken place.
     
  5. cissy3

    cissy3 Star commenter

  6. Mr_Ed

    Mr_Ed Lead commenter

    It seems this story has reached a conclusion today, it is an interesting one - I did not want to start another thread, so this seems the best place. It is E-ACT this time, not Perry Beeches: https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news...s-case-after-being-dismissed-over-911-footage

    "A Muslim teaching assistant who was sacked for objecting to 11-year-olds being shown graphic footage of the 9/11 attacks has won an unfair dismissal case against her former school.

    Suriyah Bi, 25, was dismissed from the Heartlands Academy in Birmingham in 2015 after raising concerns about a year seven class with special needs being played a YouTube video that showed people jumping to their deaths from the upper floors of the World Trade Center.

    The group had been studying Simon Armitage’s poem Out of the Blue, which was written for the fifth anniversary of 9/11. Bi claims that the teacher taking the lesson had to log in to her personal YouTube account to override a warning that the video was unsuitable for children and under-18s.

    She said that when a warning message appeared on the screen, children asked if they should be watching it, but were told to be quiet by the teacher. Bi raised the issue the following day, on 23 September 2015, and was dismissed just over an hour later, less than a fortnight after she started the job."


    One thing has always puzzled me though. Is it usual for Oxford Educated/PhD people to work as Teaching Assistants? (No offence intended, to any TA's reading this). Out of interest, who pays any compensation she gets, the Academy 'business' or general education funding?

    P.S. Before anyone suggests otherwise, I personally think she was in the right on this, but it would be nice to think E-ACT coughs up, not the general tax payer.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2017
  7. chelsea2

    chelsea2 Star commenter

    Doesn't the general tax payer provide the money to E-Act (and other MATs) to run the schools anyway. So, unless insurance coughs up, it'll come from school funds, i.e. tax payers' money.
     

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