1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Year R able reader/writer but no social interaction skills...help!

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by Josey111, Oct 4, 2011.

  1. I have a little boy in my class who is able to read and write ccvc/cvcc and high frequency words. He can form all lower case and capital letters correctly and is equally able in Numeracy (he can add and subtract numbers to 50). He has been to a tutor since the age of 2 and half! He says 'I want to do proper school work, I don't want to play' - I have visited my KS1 colleagues who have given me worksheets which he devours! If I work 1:1 with him I set up practical problem solving challenges but I cannot always be with him. What can I do to challenge and excite him?
    Also I am worried as he does not interact well with other children; he is shy and appears very awkward around his peers. I have modelled play with the transformers (one of his areas of interest) and try to encourage other children to play with him but with little success - I don't want him to get bored and demotivated - he always looks very miserable.
    Ideas / Tips greatly appreciated!
     
  2. I have a little boy in my class who is able to read and write ccvc/cvcc and high frequency words. He can form all lower case and capital letters correctly and is equally able in Numeracy (he can add and subtract numbers to 50). He has been to a tutor since the age of 2 and half! He says 'I want to do proper school work, I don't want to play' - I have visited my KS1 colleagues who have given me worksheets which he devours! If I work 1:1 with him I set up practical problem solving challenges but I cannot always be with him. What can I do to challenge and excite him?
    Also I am worried as he does not interact well with other children; he is shy and appears very awkward around his peers. I have modelled play with the transformers (one of his areas of interest) and try to encourage other children to play with him but with little success - I don't want him to get bored and demotivated - he always looks very miserable.
    Ideas / Tips greatly appreciated!
     
  3. Leapyearbaby64

    Leapyearbaby64 New commenter

    Can he investigate independently? I had a very bright child last year who could do work put in front of him, but completely lacked any oomph in terms of being a self-starter. It's a big failure of mine that I did not manage to change his mindset. Tutoring suggests that he sees work as worksheets rather than using his intellect to solve problems. You can get boxes of "thinking outside the box" cards for older children which may be worth a look. They are on Amazon.
     
  4. Doitforfree

    Doitforfree Star commenter

    If he doesn't want to play with other children I can't see that that really matters.
     
  5. The thinking outside the box cards sound very intersting - thank you for the suggestion.
    I do think the ability to integrate, negotiate and communicate through play is very important. I believe play is crucial to the developement of emotional and social skills; I worry that he is missing out and I want to support him to be a well-rounded, happy individual.
     
  6. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Yep I see your point about the missing play with others, and it may or may not be caused by the tutoring. He might get plenty of it at home though so you could worry less then?
    Does he play at home with other children? What do the parents say about this? Are there any children within the class who he seems to have a preference for? Some children need a lot of contact with a child before they start playing with them so you might have to do something so that they are in close proximity for a lot of time on a daily basis before play with that child will commence?
    One of my children's reception class teachers used to start children off first thing with an activity in small groups the moment the children walked through the door. That was great for an easy drop-off and smooth start to the day in the classroom but there were some pitfalls for some children. The groups were fixed for the whole year. The teacher said the children were then free to move to play with who they liked after that, but in practice it did have a huge influence on who played with who. The "shyer" less exploratory children did not necessarily move off to be with their "friends" and if they were not well glued in to the "start of the day group" it worked badly for them the whole year. Some children were grouped with children that they already knew well before school and others were separated off into other groups where the children already knew one another but they did not.

    Then lunches made a big difference too - packed lunch children (majority) were separated from school lunch eaters (minority) and some school lunch eaters then found it hard to integrate back after lunch with the the packed lunch eaters who had been together all the time.
    From my own personal experience my own children have gone through phases of being choosey about who they do and don't play with. As they get older this seems to become less of a problem and they are happier to play with anyone, but there are still certain situation into which you could put them and it would seem as though they are incapable of play, but they are definitely not.
    It changes with age partly because the child themself changes and learns more "social skills" but also because the nature of play changes as the other children mature. For example if this boy enjoys playing with children one to one and having a lot of quiet conversation he might feel a bit incapable in a less verbal more boisterous environment. That is probably the wrong example, but you might be able to relate to it. Frequently children play group games in the playground which some children just don't "get" - the same old repetitive game of Star Wars for example, where the children basically act out the same things and yell the same words every day. Some children think there is more to it than that and just can't join in with the group because that's not their style, and they are worried about getting it wrong.
    Can others join him with his worksheets? You might develop a worksheet gang who then move on to better things?
     
  7. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    i.e. get some others involved in the exciting activities you would like to prepare one to one for him. There must be others who have sufficient mental capacity to join in with some interesting problem solving. Then you are not asking others to play with him, but to join in with something interesting. At the moment it's like you think he is the only able child in the class so you will push him even further away from the rest and cultivate the geek in the corner.

     
  8. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    I have a little boy in my class who is able to read and write
    ccvc/cvcc and high frequency words. He can form all lower case
    and capital letters correctly and is equally able in Numeracy (he can
    add and subtract numbers to 50).
    Also, I meant to say don't make the mistake of thinking that any of that is particularly amazing. You risk treating him as very bright (which is fine) but the others as not so bright (not so good).
    When you say he can add and subtract numbers up to 50 are you talking about taking double digit from double digit and how does he do it? If he has a good method why does it stop at 50? It sounds very strange.
    Also although that reading is a good start, surely there are others in the class who after a term of good phonics teaching will be able to do more than that?
    If he really has been tutored since 2 and a half he hasn't really made much progress.
     
  9. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Talk to his parents. Perhaps he's already developed a negatie attitude towards school. Perhaps he's tired if he's having too much dumped on him.
    Group scientific explorations might appeal
    Breadmaking, from scratch, is sociable and fascinating.
    Paired construction challenges might bring him into closer incidental contact with another child if you match him up sensitively.
     
  10. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Those sound like lovely suggestions. The more I think about it the whole scenario sounds a little strange.
     
  11. It's really helpful to hear your comments - thank you for taking the time to respond. My little boy has come out of his shell a bit today. I ditched the worksheets and gave him a construction challenge which he loved - another child was eager to work with him and they then chose to sit together at lunch. I think I was getting a bit worried as he stood out from the others but maybe he needs a little time to find his feet. When we went on the home visit you would never have thought that a child lived in the house - no toys or obvious traces of childhood; I guess I should not have been surprised at his slow interaction.
    Thanks again for your thoughts, much appreciated.
     
  12. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Well that's good, and you know the worksheets probably did serve a purpose in making him feel "at home". Do you think he has his toys etc neatly stowed away upstairs? It does sound a little odd --- my house is littered from end to end with traces of childhood, including my own!
    How lovely they chose to sit together at lunch. Hope nothing gets in the way of that developing a bit further.
     
  13. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Parents tend to clear up before an important visit.

    I've just thought about what early days these are. Don't fret too much.


     

Share This Page