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Year one teacher refusing to tie shoelaces?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by pinkflipflop, Mar 19, 2011.

  1. I teach in year 3 and tie up the odd shoe lace. However I normally ask if the child has a really kind and helpful friend that can do it up for them. This is followed by loads of praise for that friend. As all the children want that praise they are all desperate to learn to tie shoe laces and practise at home. One vla child in particular won't to reading spelling or any homework. However he can now do his shoe laces and often stops playing at playtime to help antone with laces.
     
    frances_earnshaw1 likes this.
  2. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I must have the "gutsiest" in the country then
     
  3. Really?! Get a grip you lot! We're talking about kids here & helping them learn both life skills & getting the most from their learning environment. I teach in a 1600 pupil successful secondary school & have pupils in ability sets for PE. In a short 50 min single, I'd rather do a lace (and believe me, some are from year 9 pupils!) if it means that pupil is safe & can perform appropriately in order to make progress then them try 3-4 times in a lesson while I need them to concentrate & focus for such a brief & important period of time. A number of disadvantaged pupils don't have parents that have/spend time teaching them such basic skills. It's no drama to do it there and then & I always offer them help in learning during a break or lunch should they need it.
     
  4. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    All these first time posters
     
  5. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Really? I value my breaks.
     
  6. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    No it doesn't. When you're little you just ask. What a ludicrous assertion.

     
  7. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Good advice
     
  8. It is dangerous to have untied laces; of course I would deal with them, especially on a one off day. At other times I have sometimes asked them to get a friend to tie them providing a little bit of peer pressure but still solving the problem. We have to learn to pick our fights. Homework, behaviour, getting to bed on time....all worth the fight.....not tying laces.
     
  9. Perhaps if shoelace tying was included in the NCTs, and we had to show on our timetable where we were teaching it (seeing as we can end up doing it 30 times however many times a day) it would be taken as a more serious priority by more teachers on a daily basis.
    However, seeing as SMT value things such as getting a child who cannot count to 20 in year 3 yet to a level 3a in Numeracy by the end of this term, I very much doubt it is considered a pressing need by SMT, and therefore should not be a feature of our teaching lives apparently. Far more important we spend about 4 hours copying names out several times to show whether they are on target, below target, or above target for the assessment co-ordinator (because he can't work SIMs software). Teaching in this country just rocks and makes your heart swell nowadays, doesn't it?
     
  10. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2nHLiRTxuo&feature=related
     
  11. So glad my own children were never in your class.
    It is par for the course for a KS1 teacher to do up laces. Parents can't always guarantee being able to buy velcro shoes. My son was often given a choice of one style of shoe as he had such narrow feet the shop didn't carry the stock.
    As learning support in a secondary school the dyspraxic boy I support only learned how to tie his laces last year, year 9, but that is part of his condition.
    I hope your TA reads your comment so she can sue you for gross unprofessionalism. Most TAs do 2-3 years at college studying childcare or education courses and many more study for Foundation or full degrees so we are not just some muppet who was dragged off the street.

     
  12. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Lucky you getting a break (even if it is like a Friday evening beer)
     
  13. I am shocked that soo many teachers have problems with tying shoelaces. Surely it is a healt and safety risk not too. I teach year 3 and 4 and today we had our tennis coach in school. at least a quarter of my class cannot tie there own shoelaces! It takes me and my lace tying buddies seconds to tie laces!
    Yes, i will be sending home a letter over Easter asking all parents to support there children in learning however there will still be some children who cant.
    Surely beinding down and tying a lace or ten isnt beyond our remitt- i really think some teachers need to wind their necks in!!!!
     
  14. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    another first time poster![​IMG]
     
  15. Interesting. I mentioned this point to a friend who is a litigation lawyer. He said "Volenti non fit injuria". Roughly translated, this is "the voluntary assumption of risk". When the parent/guardian provides laced shoes for the child, which the child is unable to fasten, then it is that parent/guardian who has exposed the child to any foreseable risk of injury, such as through tripping, and that the request to the teacher to fasten the lace would not constitute a "novus actus interveniens" or something like that. He went on to say that if the school adopted a policy which required their teachers/teaching assistants to fasten laces, he would happily take on the case of the teacher/teaching assistant who became ill from the undoubted exposure to urine borne diseases. The claim would then be directed against the employer school. Imagine the presentation of exhibits A - Z ! Surely there needs to be a rebalancing of responsibility to the parents/guardians.
     
  16. Why are we so worried about what is on the children's laces....think about what's on their hands!
     
  17. I teach year 1 and tie shoelaces on a non uniform day without question, but like others have said, will always double knot them so they stay tied. I would never refuse to tie a 5 or 6 year old child's laces. When I worked in special ed that was the sort of thing we spent time teaching- yes it is a shame that we don't seem to have time to teach that to our mainstream kids. Not all of them will have the support at home to learn what is a very important life skill. I was almost 7 when I learnt, hence out of year 1, and was a high achieving child.
     
  18. I totally understand not wanting to tie up shoe laces etc and for that very reason spent hours trawling the shops for velcro trainers for PE for my daughter (yr2) who unfortunately has size 3 feet!! It was impossible so I had to get her laces. We practised tying them but she really struggles to do them tight enough to do PE safely. Hopefully her teacher does help most of the time!
     
  19. Didnt realise i wasn't allowed too! yes this is the first time i have posted but only because i cant believe how pathetic this is. Have a heart they are kids after all- we all were and im sure some of you wonderfully clever teachers had trouble tying laces!!!!
     
  20. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    the more the merrier it's just interesting that this thread has inspired so many long serving members to make that first post[​IMG]
     

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