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Year 9 scheme as a foundation year between KS3 and KS4?

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by Joe R, May 5, 2012.

  1. With the impact of Linear specifications, we are looking at the best way to use Year 9.
    We have a two-year KS3 scheme running and are looking to revert to a two-year KS4 Linear course (we don't get straight sets until Year 10).
    We see Year 9 as a Foundation year to get the pupils ready for GCSE. Has anyone seen a good scheme or textbook etc. out there that covers lots of functional elements, whilst keeping skills practised etc?
     
  2. With the impact of Linear specifications, we are looking at the best way to use Year 9.
    We have a two-year KS3 scheme running and are looking to revert to a two-year KS4 Linear course (we don't get straight sets until Year 10).
    We see Year 9 as a Foundation year to get the pupils ready for GCSE. Has anyone seen a good scheme or textbook etc. out there that covers lots of functional elements, whilst keeping skills practised etc?
     
  3. We have historically had a two year KS3 starting GCSE in year 9. This hasn't been successful, students were doing exams far too early and many resits were necessary. We are going back to a three year KS3 and using the old OCR Graduated Assessment as a stepping stone for GCSE. We're getting the Cambridge Essentials Textbooks and will supplement this with the Whiteboard Maths Functional Skills.
     
  4. This is a debate those looking at the new national curriculum had. They didn't seem to come to any actual conclusion (it seemed to me that way).
    I liked an idea that split secondary into a 2-1-2 system from the present 3-2 system. Two years for KS2, then a year as a sort of foundation to GCSE.
    Then again, I liked the ideas of having less choice at GCSE level similar to our European contempories. I do feel we stop students studying some subjects far too early. Furthermore, it makes a great deal of sense to continue with a broader curriculum into KS5 in a similar way to many other European countries too.
    Just because it's been done one way for years doesn't make it right.
    Problem is, any Government willing to make such a major change would be taking a massive risk with the electorate as parents have been schooled one way themselves and expect it to continue in exactly the same way for their children.
     
  5. I see this as less ofa problem in Maths than in pretty much any other subject. The NC (in its current form) goes up in levels. We may well disagree (and I certsinly do) about how topics are placed into levels, but ut makes the teaching simple.
    Wherever a kid is at the end of year 8 that's where you start to teach them in year 9. It doesn't matter whether this is as part of a 2 or 3 year GCSE, a"bridging" year or part of a 3 year KS3. If a kid can add fractions with a common denominator, then teach them to fnd common denominators. If they can solve "one step" equatkions, teach them 2 step equations.
    It's not rocket science (unless they are learning Mechanics).
    .
    cyolba, trying to teach year 9 their 4 times tables :)
     
  6. Absolutely agree with this.
     

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