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Year 9 Behaviour Management Battlefield

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Mitch1985, Feb 2, 2012.

  1. Good afternoon,
    I wonder if any experienced forum members would be kind enough to offer a frazzled GTP student some advice on a subject that is fast becoming the proverbial thorn in one's side (to put it nicely).... Year 9 students with challenging behaviour.
    I am currently training to teach MFL on a GTP training programme in a secondary high school in Kent . As I suspect may be fairly common for some trainee teachers these days, I have been having severe issues with one of my classes and feel that I have unfortunately hit a brick wall with them. Issues in the lessons vary from rude and offensive language (somtimes directed at me but, would you believe, that when picked up on this, they invariably offer the 'I ain't done nuffin, I never said nuffin or summink' standardised response ); to feral and almost pack-like behaviour; to a blatant disregard for classroom rules (that I have tried relentlessly to impose and follow through with consequences for those darlings that find this concept just impossible, bless them) and no comprehension of R-e-s-p-e-c-t for anyone or anything around them (books; tables; classmates; teachers...)
    I can understand that some pupils may find MFL more dfficult and that this can sometimes be a root of their challenging behaviour, but I am trying to teach them in as clear a way as possible, bearing in mind they are studying the GCSE syllabus now. Most of them are capable and fairly intelligent (one pupil in twenty-two is classified with AEN) I have shown my lesson plans to my Subject Mentor, who has said they are well- thought out, with a good level of differentiation and with good, varied and well sequenced tasks that all pupils are capable of (if they are not 'too tired to pick up a pen after playing the Xbox 'til midnight, Miss').
    I have tried seating plans, removing the temptation of distraction. I have tried sanctions (following the school's BM policy) with detentions, letters home, lunchtime catch-up sessions, phone calls home, subject reports........... All to no avail. One 'challenging' student may begin to show signs of encouragement, yet as soon as this happens, another decides that ' Spanish is s**t' and that 'all teachers are **** anyway' etc etc.and the problems are perpetuated.
    I have tried to be firm but fair and feel awful that the 6 hardworking, polite and nice pupils are being held back by the remaining 16 who seem to intent on educational suicide. I have been incredibly patient with them so far but this is beginning to affect me, as my usually chirpy and persevering self is becoming increasingly down beat and resentful. (Perhaps this is partly because I spend hours preparing their lessons, only for half of them to 'c*ss me down' and 'mug me off' - their words, not mine)
    I am not sure what else I can try! The class teacher with whom I share the teaching is having the same problems with the class and although I can appreciate that having two teachers may be incredibly difficult for them to understand, we have worked tirelessly to maintain continuity and try to improve the environment we are having to work in.
    Does anybody have any suggestions that I could maybe try to implement? Any techniques that have even the most 'streetwise' kids with their bums on seats and pens in hand, poised to participate? Or am I asking too much?
    Any advice would be gratefully received. Failing that, a bottle of vodka and a month of snow days should do the trick ;)
    Many thanks in advance
     
  2. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Perhaps either the MFL or Secondary or Behaviour forums might be a better place to post?
     

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