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Year 6 SATs run up....

Discussion in 'Primary' started by tick/star/smileyface, Feb 26, 2012.

  1. tick/star/smileyface

    tick/star/smileyface New commenter

    Hi, I'm completely new to year 6 and on my own. Add to this the fact that no one in my school has taught year 6 before and I clearly have a few questions to ask!
    Any year 6 experts out there care to share how they work in the run up to the big week? Any tips for revision, important things to remember? And of course, keeping the fun there too!
    Any tips would be fabulous. Thank you
     
  2. tick/star/smileyface

    tick/star/smileyface New commenter

    Hi, I'm completely new to year 6 and on my own. Add to this the fact that no one in my school has taught year 6 before and I clearly have a few questions to ask!
    Any year 6 experts out there care to share how they work in the run up to the big week? Any tips for revision, important things to remember? And of course, keeping the fun there too!
    Any tips would be fabulous. Thank you
     
  3. jwraft

    jwraft New commenter

    It's a scary time! I'm new to Y6 this year but have people in school who've advised me. I'll run through what we're doing and hopefully it might help you.

    I have quite a low ability class and so decided to start the build up to SATS back in January. In saying that I've not been doing much different to what would constitute a normal week anyway (not that we have many normal weeks). We do 30 minutes of reading every morning, an hour or english and an hour of maths. Our school has adopted a creative curriculum so I am probably the only class that teaches english and maths every day. We've been working through the different areas, consolidating and revising skills as well as gaining new ones. We've been looking through all of the different non-fiction text types and practising writing them.

    We still have our creative curriculum in an afternoon, which is important for my children as I don't want them to disengage with school. But I've been keeping the mornings fun too. All of our writing work is based around an animation called Hoverbike, we've been writing different texts based on that. It's quite humorous and open-ended and the kids love it.

    I have SATS boosters on Tuesday and Thursday nights, one english, one maths, for an hour after school. The school has done this for a fair few years. I've had full attendance to every session so far and that's because I try my hardest to keep it fun and interesting, but still consolidating and revising. For instance we acted out some poetry (jabberwocky, which was hilarious), we've written our own sats papers for other children to try, we're going to do some descriptive writing with some chip shop chips soon.

    I did some old papers back in January to give me an idea of gaps, I will be doing this again in April to make sure gaps have been filled and to identify other gaps that need filling.

    To keep up work ethic we have a friday treat if they've worked hard and behaved well - which they've done so far. This might just be a pack of biscuits or some milkshake or something. During Our World Week we made Chinese food as a treat.

    It might seem like we're quite full on in the build up but the class need it. They're still engaged so I know I'm not boring them to death. I'm keeping it as fun as possible with lots of positive reinforcement. I think how you do it will depend on your school and your class.

    Good Luck!
     
  4. tick/star/smileyface

    tick/star/smileyface New commenter

    Thank you so much for your reply - really useful. I have a massive range in my class - level 1 to potential level 6 in numeracy and EVERYTHING in between! I started doing maths papers last week - we did 1 of each of the 3 papers, to see the gaps and also to get the used to the format as they are all scared! Im obviously reassuring them, but dont want any silly mistakes on things they can do! My main concern is the level 3 numeracy children - how are you supporting those that could slip down on a bad day?
    Thanks again!
     
  5. jwraft

    jwraft New commenter

    I have a focus group who were 3c in September that needed to be boosted to 4. This group is always well supported in lessons and I analyse their gaps more so than the other children. They've been doing sats style questions in plenaries since september to they're very familiar with the format now and am just hoping that bad day doesn't come!

    Another thing we do is during SATS week we provide breakfast for all Year 6 children. This makes sure they're in school on time, settled and with a full belly! They come in about 40 minutes before the other children.
     
  6. I think jwraft and I are clones, even down to using the hoverbike this term for the basis of our writing each week! We cover a different genre/text type each week, looking at the success criteria, planning, discussing, drafting and writing! In maths we look at a topic a week this term and use SATs questions on the Friday of the week for practice. I run a weekly homework club ( all the year 6's have the CGP maths study guides and targetted question books and the similar ones for English which they do for homewrok each week) where we look at the sections they have covered and cover any areas they found difficult. We also provide Breakfast Club during SATs week!
     
  7. jwraft

    jwraft New commenter

    We've bought different study guides for each child but set homework in these also. We also do the exact same in writing, success criteria in first lesson, planning and writing next lesson, improving third lesson! I think we need to share notes vikinggirl!
     
  8. Although it's not an overly popular or fun view, I think it's vital that we give the children practise papers. Obviously not all the time, but mine feel a lot more confident now they know they structure of the papers and what type of questions they'll be asked. This is especially noticable in maths where children can be very good at number but not as strong at interpreting questions and what is expected.
    In addition to that, within writing I've been very strict on time limits and structuring their work so they can actually complete a piece of writing. We talk about what the task might be, how many sections they want to write and then how long they have (approximately) to write each section-leaving time to check work over.
    Some people would argue that I'm teaching them to pass tests and yes, I am. However, these skills will apply for life and they'll need them in secondary school too.
    During the normal school week we don't shove sats down their throats but they want to do well and I want to help them achieve that. We do still do fun lessons and still make lit and num engaging, interesting and varied-not just for sats but I do find that actually knowing how to answer papers relaxes the children and leads to them producing the work they're capable of.
     
  9. jwraft

    jwraft New commenter

    I agree with you pixieperson, they need to be familiar with the structure of the paper to stand a chance. I don't think you're teaching them to pass tests at all, you're teaching them how to sit and understand a formal test, which is an essential skill in life anyway!
     
  10. tick/star/smileyface

    tick/star/smileyface New commenter

    HI all! Getting so much closer to the dreaded SATS now!! I just wondered if anyone would like to share their plan for the run up to the week - I'm a newbie and don't have a set plan yet. Anyone experienced care to share how they normally prepare in the last few weeks? Thanks!
     

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