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Year 6 SATs - extra time

Discussion in 'Primary' started by miss_informed, Feb 26, 2009.

  1. just wondering what tests people are using this year for their 'extra time' children. I'm finding it very hard to prove that they will do better given 25% extra time as many of the recommended tests get harded as the test goes on, so those children can't access the questions at the end. At present I have given them a suffolk reading scale (8+) and am going to try the 'access reading test' today. This is for criteria A2.
    But in reality the SATs don't work like this.... any thoughts?
     
  2. just wondering what tests people are using this year for their 'extra time' children. I'm finding it very hard to prove that they will do better given 25% extra time as many of the recommended tests get harded as the test goes on, so those children can't access the questions at the end. At present I have given them a suffolk reading scale (8+) and am going to try the 'access reading test' today. This is for criteria A2.
    But in reality the SATs don't work like this.... any thoughts?
     
  3. List of acceptable tests can be downloaded from http://www.naa.org.uk/naa_18943.aspx (as pdf on right hand side).

     
  4. Thanks, I do have this list I was just wondering what people's preferred tests were.
    I now have the evidence I need, but it is always such a big issue each year.
     
  5. Hi,
    Did you get any helpful answers?
    I have just taken over as head of Y6 and am starting to look at what tests I can use to help gather evidence.
    Any links to tests would be fab!
    At the moment I know I can do a Words Per Minute writing task, but which reading tests are acceptable?
    Thanks
     
  6. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter

    Markuss understood you just fine. He is a troll that likes to point out the correct name for SATs is NCTs. However, he never does this in a constructive way and most people grew tired of him months ago.
     
  7. Do you patrol the forum just looking for people to refer to the tests as SATs?
    Do you really not have anything better to do?

    In reply to the OP: I struggled to get extra time for my year sixes last year... they would have done so much better with extra time but just missed out on qualifying for it! I'll be interested to hear what advice people have for you as I have a weaker cohort this year including a number with very weak reading and comprehension skills.
     
  8. Doitforfree

    Doitforfree Established commenter

    I don't understand why some children would get extra time. If they can't do the test in the allotted time then they aren't at the required standard. It doesn't matter what the reason is. If they're just really thick they don't get extra time, but surely that's as much of a hindrance as being 'slow processors'. If NCYs are supposed to show who can do what then giving some children extra time is unhelpful at best and downright dishonest at worst. It's no wonder secondary schools have to retest children to find out what they can really do.
     
  9. flapfish

    flapfish New commenter

    <address> What compassion! My son had extra time because he is autistic. He has a very high IQ and a low processing speed. This does not mean that he cannot read or write but it takes him a long time and is a cause of much frustration. He feels his 'failure' intensely. If we are going to subject children of this age to these tests regardless, then at least have a little regard to their wellbeing. SATs only show 'what they can really do' only in these circumstances. </address>
     
  10. Doitforfree

    Doitforfree Established commenter

    But NCTs were never meant to show what a child could do. They were to see how many children could pass the test. Changing the circumstances of the tests for some children makes the results meaningless. It's nothing to do with compassion. If the government wants to know how many children can answer the questions in a certain time then it makes no sense to give some children more time.
    I am totally against these tests. They are setting a fair number of children up to fail and they skew the primary curriculum to a huge extent. They only test a narrow range of skills and abilities, as you so rightly point out. The skills of a child who thinks slowly and deeply about something are just as valuable, if not more so. as those of the child who doesn't think at all but has been well trained to answer the particular type of questions on an NCT paper.
     

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