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Year 3 help wanted

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by Fishter, Jan 26, 2011.

  1. I would be grateful for advice on behaviour management. I am a recently qualified teacher working with Y3 pupils. During my teaching practices I didn't have any obvious problems with behaviour. However, with my current class (who are well-known in the school for their behaviour since infants) are really causing me some trouble.
    It is hard to engage them and to keep their attention despite my planning what I believe are fun lessons. We made up class rules at the start of the year and I constantly draw their attention to them (they are displayed prominently in the classroom). However, despite this there are still children who stand up when I am delivering my lesson and attempt to walk across the room. There are children who ask questions without raising their hand, interrupting me when I am speaking. There are others that shout out during my input session or talk to those around them. Even during individual work there are children who are disruptive and disobedient. I have tried lots of techniques that I have used before - such as Star of the Week and stickers for good behaviour. I use positive and negative points and ask the children to explain to me why they are given these points.
    My main difficulty is that I am in a foreign state school system and I do not have the class to myself. They have another teacher who teaches them most of the subjects. Although I try to co-ordinate with this teacher to make sure we use the same or similar strategies it can be difficult. I am also unable to use techniques such as table points as the teacher has the classroom set up in rows and I cannot change this.
    I have also had a problem with children asking to go to the toilet constantly. I am about to try a technique I read about which is to have a "necklace" at the front of the room and if someone wants to go to the toilet they take this with them. That way children know they can only go one at a time and it also stops them interrupting the lesson to ask. Any other ideas would be gratefully received.
    I have basic classroom facilities available (no interactive whiteboards, mini whiteboards etc) so I try and be creative to make my lessons engaging but wonder where I am failing. I know that i need to be consistent with behaviour management but the tricks that I have tried seem to have little effect. When I first introduced stickers and certificates for good behaviour on Fridays children were well behaved all week. Now they just buck up a bit on Fridays! The school doesn't really have much of a whole school policy and I am willing to try anything!




     
  2. I would be grateful for advice on behaviour management. I am a recently qualified teacher working with Y3 pupils. During my teaching practices I didn't have any obvious problems with behaviour. However, with my current class (who are well-known in the school for their behaviour since infants) are really causing me some trouble.
    It is hard to engage them and to keep their attention despite my planning what I believe are fun lessons. We made up class rules at the start of the year and I constantly draw their attention to them (they are displayed prominently in the classroom). However, despite this there are still children who stand up when I am delivering my lesson and attempt to walk across the room. There are children who ask questions without raising their hand, interrupting me when I am speaking. There are others that shout out during my input session or talk to those around them. Even during individual work there are children who are disruptive and disobedient. I have tried lots of techniques that I have used before - such as Star of the Week and stickers for good behaviour. I use positive and negative points and ask the children to explain to me why they are given these points.
    My main difficulty is that I am in a foreign state school system and I do not have the class to myself. They have another teacher who teaches them most of the subjects. Although I try to co-ordinate with this teacher to make sure we use the same or similar strategies it can be difficult. I am also unable to use techniques such as table points as the teacher has the classroom set up in rows and I cannot change this.
    I have also had a problem with children asking to go to the toilet constantly. I am about to try a technique I read about which is to have a "necklace" at the front of the room and if someone wants to go to the toilet they take this with them. That way children know they can only go one at a time and it also stops them interrupting the lesson to ask. Any other ideas would be gratefully received.
    I have basic classroom facilities available (no interactive whiteboards, mini whiteboards etc) so I try and be creative to make my lessons engaging but wonder where I am failing. I know that i need to be consistent with behaviour management but the tricks that I have tried seem to have little effect. When I first introduced stickers and certificates for good behaviour on Fridays children were well behaved all week. Now they just buck up a bit on Fridays! The school doesn't really have much of a whole school policy and I am willing to try anything!




     
  3. It sounds like you're having a bit of a rough time with this class! I can empathise as my class Year 1- have been notorious since nursery for their bad behaviour! When they cam to me in September I experienced a lo of what you are describing! The wandering about, shouting out, toilet demands....all quite tiring I know!
    The first thing is to set clear boundaries. Even though you share with another teacher, the children should know what behaviour YOU expect from them. Raise your expectations of their behaviour and follow through your demands. So for example when you say no wandering about, mean it. State clearly at the start of each session if necessary what you expect. Might take a while of doing it!
    Next, my biggest success with my class has been the use of positive praise. 'Catch' as many children as you can being 'good' and state who they are and why you're proud of their behaviour. I have a star chart system where if I catch someone being good, they get a star. Every 10 stars gains a little prize- lolly, pencil, rubber, etc. I make reward systems individual to emphasise that they are all their own people and responsible for their own behaviour.
    Finally my consequence is usually time out at play time, I talk to them during this time about why they are missing play time and how they need to behave/react next time. Yes it means sometimes I dont get a break but I think its working in the long run.
    I know this will all sound obvious stuff but hope it can be of some help to you.
    Good luck![​IMG]
     
  4. Thanks. I will try asking them for the class rules at the start of every lesson.
    I will also consider making a rewards system unique to their classes with me. They have this with the Star of the Week diploma and stickers, but maybe something more visual such as a rewards chart on the wall (they have one already but not unique to MY lessons) might do the trick. Thanks for your advice.
    I do try to constantly reward positive behaviour and will have to try and keep on with this.

    Anyone else got any advice on constant mithering for trips to the toilet? (In the most cases it is because they want to go for a wander and not because they actually need to go!)


     
  5. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    You could also try 'telling' them the rules. As in telling them your expectations and effectively demanding that they comply.
    Say something like 'ask me in 5 mins if you get desperate'. If they really need to go then they will ask again, if not probably they won't. Or you can simply tell them no. They are year 3 they have good bladder control they can wait. Or you can reward (jelly beans are good if your school allows) anyone who hasn't asked to go all session. So tick off each time a child asks to go and then at the end of the day reward those with no ticks. (Could link it to your star chart. Star for all those who haven't asked.)
     
  6. Great idea MinnieMinx, thanks!!
    With regards to "asking" the children for the class rules, I was referring more to "eliciting" them, but yes, it is also true that I need to be shown to be firm.
    Thanks for your ideas.
     

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