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Year 2 Interview- not asking for lesson plan, but advice on my plan!

Discussion in 'Primary' started by jmlm2212, Apr 21, 2012.

  1. I have an interview on Tuesday for a job that I am so desperate to get! I have to teach a 30 minute lesson of my choice to a Year 2 class of about 30 children. I am a PGCE student and have taught Reception and Year 1 on my placements so far, so am worried about making sure I pitch the lesson right as I have no experience on Year 2, and in a previous interview I had the head said that my lesson wasn't challenging enough. This is what I have thought I could do:
    A lesson on alliteration:
    LO: To understand what alliteration is and be able to write sentences using alliteration.
    Intro:
    I am going to read them some silly sentences with alliteration, doing something that I saw online called a 'smile test' i.e. I read them silly sentences and they have to see how long they can keep a straight face for! I then ask them to tell me what they notice about the sentences- leading onto explaining about alliteraton.

    Main activity:
    I want the children to go off in pairs and write some sentences (that can be silly) with alliteration, and tell them that they can write about something they really like e.g. their favourite food, toy, person etc. Ask for their sentences to have at least 4 alliterated words in.
    LA: I will support them working in pairs to ensure they have at least one sentence each.
    HA: They can write sentences with a larger number of alliterated words in e.g.5 or 6 and possible introduce similes into their writing e.g. the royal round ruby was as red as a rose.

    Plenary:
    Gather the children back on the carpet and ask some children to share their sentences with the class. After they have read them, ask the other children to do 'two stars and a wish' about the child's sentences i.e. the wish being suggesting another word they could add or something.

    Do you think this will be ok? Do you think it needs to bemore creative?
    Really appreciate any help, sorry for the long post, just hoped it would be more constructive than just asking people for lesson ideas! :)
     
  2. I have an interview on Tuesday for a job that I am so desperate to get! I have to teach a 30 minute lesson of my choice to a Year 2 class of about 30 children. I am a PGCE student and have taught Reception and Year 1 on my placements so far, so am worried about making sure I pitch the lesson right as I have no experience on Year 2, and in a previous interview I had the head said that my lesson wasn't challenging enough. This is what I have thought I could do:
    A lesson on alliteration:
    LO: To understand what alliteration is and be able to write sentences using alliteration.
    Intro:
    I am going to read them some silly sentences with alliteration, doing something that I saw online called a 'smile test' i.e. I read them silly sentences and they have to see how long they can keep a straight face for! I then ask them to tell me what they notice about the sentences- leading onto explaining about alliteraton.

    Main activity:
    I want the children to go off in pairs and write some sentences (that can be silly) with alliteration, and tell them that they can write about something they really like e.g. their favourite food, toy, person etc. Ask for their sentences to have at least 4 alliterated words in.
    LA: I will support them working in pairs to ensure they have at least one sentence each.
    HA: They can write sentences with a larger number of alliterated words in e.g.5 or 6 and possible introduce similes into their writing e.g. the royal round ruby was as red as a rose.

    Plenary:
    Gather the children back on the carpet and ask some children to share their sentences with the class. After they have read them, ask the other children to do 'two stars and a wish' about the child's sentences i.e. the wish being suggesting another word they could add or something.

    Do you think this will be ok? Do you think it needs to bemore creative?
    Really appreciate any help, sorry for the long post, just hoped it would be more constructive than just asking people for lesson ideas! :)
     
  3. Keep Smiling!

    Keep Smiling! New commenter

    Hi, I'm a KS2 teacher so I'm sure someone will be along from Year 2 soon to tell you if it's pitched right but what I would suggest is to model the sentences before asking the chdn to go off in pairs so they are really clear on what you expect of them. Maybe make up a couple as a class then send them off in pairs? But it sounds like a lovely lesson!
     
  4. Ah yes, I forgot that bit!! Thank you very much :)
     
  5. I really like it too, but agree with the poster above and would add that I think letting them write alliterative sentences about anything might phase them so i'd perhaps give them either a theme (such as animals), or a selection of pictures (They could be things that you know there are lots of alliterative describing words for) as prompts. Particularly for your MA if you are working with the LA.
    I'd do a shared write by displaying a picture and then asking them to use talk partners (talk is a BIG thing at the moment) to try and think of a describing words that begin with the same sound, then a doing word that begins with the same sound, then an object. Emphasise spelling of the word 'the' as this is the common sentence starter.
    Then you are really scaffolding a sentence such as "The red rose ran round a ruby". "The round rose rocketed past a rainbow" etc. It would just really help with the sentence structure as I think with the level of freedom given to them in your current plan, some of your LA/MA may flounder.
     
  6. clawthorpegirl

    clawthorpegirl New commenter

    It's highly likely that Y2 children will already be familiar with alliteration so I'd make sure you're talking about why writers choose to use it in their writing and that you want the children to use it to make their writing funny, silly etc. Otherwise you may struggle to show progression in the lesson.
    I agree with other advice regarding giving them a stimulus for their writing - either writing about themselves, a friend in class or certain animals work really well - and modelling for them the type of writing you want them to produce. You could support LA / MA by generating alliterative words together (talk partners) before sending them off to write their sentences. HA could go and started earlier and write about a wider range of animals.
    Good luck!
     
  7. kym131218

    kym131218 New commenter

    Hello,

    I think your lesson idea is fab, and I think other posters have given you ideas I would have given you. But it's a lovely lesson and i wanted you to wish you the very best of luck!
     
  8. Thank you so much everyone for your comments, I am altering my lesson plan following your suggestions! I hope I can fit it all in...! I think I'll just ask them for one sentence each so at least they've had a taster of writing alliteration, do you think thats alright? At the end of the day, I would normally teach for 45 mins to an hour so not going to cover the same amount as usual in 30 mins. Eeek I'm nervous!!!
     
  9. As a good starter to get the children thinking, think time is very important to lead onto talk time, why don't you get them to think of something that starts with the same letter as their name, so Happy Harry. It will give you a chance to learn a few names too!
    If you choose to have a theme, have a visual prompt. For example, if you do fruit, take some with you. The LA children will need a hook and it is a great way to visually enagage children plus they can touch if needed.

    Good Luck!
     
  10. ESLAB

    ESLAB New commenter

    Lovely lesson plan and all great advice - especially restricting what they will be required to write about. The only things I would add are to think about your timings; get them to stop half way through the lesson and refer back to the LO and ask 'make sure you understand what you are learning about, if not, talk to me' kind of thing; at the end of the writing ask them to self-edit their work 'read your sentence and check your punctuation - have you used a capital letter, have you used a full-stop?' (and you do the actions). Oh yes, and at the very outset, make sure you connect really well with them - I think spending two minutes introducing yourself and setting up high expectations is so valuable (your 'stop and listen' signal and 'now back to me' signal etc). Good luck!
     
  11. Thanks so much, I really appreciate your advice :)
     
  12. I'm a big fan of mini-plenaries too. I don't necessarily stop half-way through but after they've been going for a little while, stop them to tell them you just have to share an amazing piece of writing you've just seen. Read it out and ask the rest of the class why it's good - referring back to what you asked them to include (success criteria). Praise the child and be enthusiastic saying you're sure the rest of them are coming up with some fabulous sentences too that ... (repeat success criteria). I'd do this a couple of times.

    Another big thing for many schools at the moment is 'focus groups'. Start of working with a small group of pupils giving them a bit extra input. Then when they've got going you can wander to check the others are on task and do the mini-plenary above.

    Another point to stretch the HA - you could ask them to make sure they include an adjective/verb/adverb. This could be your focus group perhaps.

    Let us know how you've got on.
     

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