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Year 11 Mocks

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by zee210, Sep 24, 2018.

  1. zee210

    zee210 New commenter

    Hi all,

    I'm just looking for ideas/wondering what other schools do for year 11 mocks. Do you:
    - use the June 2018 papers?
    - use the Nov 2018 papers?
    - use a mixture of past papers?
    I'm inclined to go with a mixture of past papers as I find that using exam papers from one year lead to pupils cheating.

    Your response is much appreciated.

    Thanks
     
  2. strawbs

    strawbs Established commenter

    check with exam board - often they do not release publicly the most recent ones so that schools can use them for mocks.
     
    zee210 likes this.
  3. linda.meyrick

    linda.meyrick New commenter

    And do you give a full Higher paper which will have topics on it not yet completed by the mock?
     
  4. gainly

    gainly Lead commenter

    I'm a tutor, don't teach in a school but my thoughts are:

    Even if the recent exams are not released publicly it is quite easy to find them on line and likely to lead to cheating. One of my students at a supposedly prestigious independent school told me the results of their maths mock exams had to be cancelled last year because of widespread cheating.

    A common complaint of my students is that the mock contains topics they haven't yet studied.

    For both reasons I think it would be better to use questions from several past papers and only covering topics they have done.
     
  5. frustum

    frustum Star commenter

    One solution to the "topics not yet completed" issue is to put something on the cover sheet about which questions they should not expect to be able to do.
     
  6. gainly

    gainly Lead commenter

    Another example of cheating which a friend of mine (head of maths in a state school) told me about was a boy who had the mark scheme on his watch. He copied all the answers correctly but to the wrong questions. It reminded me of Morecambe and Wise; "all the right notes but not necessarily in the right order.
     
  7. BG54

    BG54 New commenter

    Surely there can't be many more futile subterfuges than cheating in a mock exam.
     
  8. teselectronic

    teselectronic Occasional commenter

    Are they not cheating themselves?
     
  9. gainly

    gainly Lead commenter

    Several of my students at different schools have told me about results of mock exams being cancelled because of widespread cheating by students who have got hold of the paper in advance. Using a past paper may seem like the easy option but doesn't really seem the best and fairest one. Even if they don't deliberately cheat, it is possible they will have done the paper before.

    I agree that cheating in a GCSE mock seems pointless, but they probably don't think that far ahead.

    On the other hand, with so many students getting unconditional offers from university based on predicted grades, cheating in A level mocks might be very worthwhile.
     
  10. Maths_Shed

    Maths_Shed Occasional commenter

    Edexcel have papers available identical to the real exam except the numbers which will show up any cheating instantly.
     
  11. Penny10p

    Penny10p Occasional commenter

    I only teach Key Stage 3 but this topic interests me.
    "Even if the recent exams are not released publicly it is quite easy to find them on line and likely to lead to cheating. One of my students at a supposedly prestigious independent school told me the results of their maths mock exams had to be cancelled last year because of widespread cheating."
    How did the cheating happen? I can understand having the answers on a watch or on a piece of paper in a pencil case, for example, but assuming the school is vigilant to that sort of thing, how do the students cheat? They cannot presumably know if the school is going to use the May or November previous years paper, so do they learn the answers to both papers? If they are that good at remembering answers then it shouldn't be any problem just to remember the method of solving the calculation and do it without cheating surely?
    I have worked in schools where (at Key Stage 3) we have not been able to give the same exams as the previous year because the siblings may have sat the exam and told their brother or sister the questions. Really? A year later? Am I being very naive?
     
  12. gainly

    gainly Lead commenter

    Apart from the answers on the watch, which was from a head of maths, the others are what my tutees have told me. I don't know how the cheating was done but I'm sure it must be true as they'd have no reason to make it up. One of them was quite upset as the results of her best paper were likely to be cancelled.
     

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