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year 11 intervention

Discussion in 'Modern foreign languages' started by etizard, Mar 28, 2012.

  1. Hi,
    In our department we have recently been discussing ways of improving our A*-C percentage and in particularly targeting our C/D borderline students. We are trying to find ways of ensuring these students get Cs and not Ds! Does anyone have any tips on how you already do this? I would be very grateful for any ideas!
     
  2. henriette

    henriette New commenter

    I could suggest that you write their CAW for them, script the CAS and allow them draft copies when completing these tasks. You could even guarantee 100% A* in CAS and CAW if you followed this path!
    Let me clear, however: doing these things would be cheating on behalf of your classes and should not be done! Despite the fact that these acts are in breach of exam board guidelines, I am sure that a number of schools do them!
     
  3. Malaguena

    Malaguena New commenter

    Make sure that your candidates are including examples of past and future tenses and opinions with justifications in their CA. Based on a course attended by a member of my dept last week by AQA. Coach them a bit or give them a stack of them to learn!
     
  4. Look at exampler material from your Exam Board this will help you identify what to focus on, and how marking is done; also provide your students with A* Key words and sentences, ask them to learn them and once this is done they can use it in their tasks. In order to achieve C students have to use three different tenses in their skills, this does not have to be any difficult tenses, it could as simple as: past- present- future, and finally design tasks according to students' abilities.
     
  5. chriszwinter1

    chriszwinter1 New commenter

    May I add that it would be a good idea in the case of the CAS simply to let them read out the answers you have written for them?
    As henriette says, this would not be your students' own unaided achievement, but in the current climate our political masters, who should be our politcal servants, are not interested in genuine achievement but in manufactured results and the only rule that applies is the 11th commandment.
    Perhaps I should change my user name to "old cynic" or something similar.
     
  6. It is very telling that this dilema is all about grades and nothing to do with improving students' ability iin MFL. The desire to create a firm foundation for learning or inspiring a love for another language is missing in the initial request and the cheating the system replies.
    I am criticising the situation not the posters.
     
  7. During my Year 11 class, a very able student said to me. "Miss, can you ask me these questions in my speaking exam?"
    I replied that I could n't because it was cheating. Unfortunately where I work, students are just learning off by heart answers written by my colleagues. Then they have to act it out with spontaniety. (The students' writing is just a regurgitation of the previously marked work by the teachers)
    I am hoping not to do GCSE anymore because of cheating. (Or I will take a "bottom set" where my principales does n't affect the dept's "results"

     
  8. chriszwinter1

    chriszwinter1 New commenter

    I don't think it matters what level you're teaching or even what subject or ability. The same applies anywhere in the secondary system and beyond. I've even been told it's good practice.
    Reminds me of the old Bob Monkouse joke: What you need is sincerity. It you can fake that, you've got it made. Just substitute "spontaneity" for "sincerity", and you'll see what I mean.
     
  9. Herringthecat

    Herringthecat New commenter

    I know this is the way it works these days, but as a soon-to-be MFL teacher I find it depressing (as I'm sure many of you do too). What's the history behind this? How did it get to be like this and what was the rationale behind it? Would be fascinated to know!
     
  10. "How did it get to be like this and what was the rationale behind it?"
    Many cheating teachers are like drug addicts: they can't help themselves from cheating. However, many don't even recognised that they are cheating. (Like the homeless crack head, can't see his problem). Some even think it is good practice to be also to memorise essays word for word.(Obviously the work has been corrected by the teacher first)
    However, I am just seen as "****" teacher. Last year some of my students had the speaking exam with another teacher because they knew it will be a memory test (with a bit of drama).
    Why bother to learn all that hard stuff when you can have it for minimum effort. They even tell me it.
    But don't get too pious because like a drug addiction it can afflict itself on anyone. If you join the profession, try to stay clean. But beware of the "pushers" (SMT/HOD/OfSTED/GOV) they want you to cheat and deskill yourself.
    Good luck!
     
  11. Herringthecat

    Herringthecat New commenter

    When I did my exams, they were just that: exams. I was given a title - or a series of pictures, or something (it was a few years ago!) and I had to write in response to that. I seem to remember the orals (sorry, speaking) were the same.



    Someone somewhere decided in their wisdom that this new system was superior. Just wondered what the rationale was , then, behind giving the students and teachers the opportunity to cheat? Surely the memory test was anticipated?! (cynics will say it was because the government needed a way to give more people the chance to get high grades to say that we are getting better marks than ever before; others will perhaps suggest that it removes the stress imposed by exams and not everyone performs to their best in exams... etc etc?!)
     
  12. henriette

    henriette New commenter

    Harsh! HoDs are normally on the side of the Teachers, not the Management
     
  13. musiclover1

    musiclover1 New commenter

    10 years ago I taught the exam-based GCSE. My department was just discussing changing to a courswork option for writing, in order to come closer to that elusive 100% A-C passrate (in a grammar school). I was against it because I believed that language needs to be memorised. But the argument was that exams were too risky because they relied on an individual's performance on a particular day.
    I assume CA's were introduced as a half-way house between coursework and exams after coursework was discredited by cheating.
    The exam boards need customers in the shape of pupils taking their exams - that's how they make their money. It's a crazy system where it really is in the best interest for the boards to make up exams that aren't too challenging and that pupils want to take.
    That's all I know about this.
    I'm really stressed out at the moment because I know that my pupils would have got at least B under the old system, but now they might not because I haven't spoon-fed them enough, so they won't be able to compete with students from other schools. I took them over in Year 11 - luckily their previous teacher had already done a few CAs, but they were year 10 standard. I've done fine with the speaking, I think (worried about the moderation though), but for writing they did a really hard CA on the environment, which a number of them didn't manage that well on. And now I gave them a supposedly 'fool-proof' one on 'My week-end', and some of them managed to go off at a tangent - so they'll get low content marks. So now the only thing left for me to do is to use what they did last year or to change the title and one of the bullet points and rush through yet another CA, though I don't know on what topic. I just want my pupils to get the grades they deserve - not higher or lower.
    Their 'environment CAs' read more like early AS work - really complicated arguments and sentence structures, but because the language was adventurous there were quite a few even basic mistakes or some 'cobbled together' sentences where their knowledge of the grammar wasn't keeping up with their desire to express themselves. There's nothing on the website that tells you what sort of marks they would give to a piece of work like that.

     
  14. musiclover1

    musiclover1 New commenter

    What they do in my school do get D's up to C's is target those pupils with mentors, phone calls home, extra revision sessions, extra work etc.
     
  15. I thought HODs are management.
     
  16. chriszwinter1

    chriszwinter1 New commenter

    Having been one, I can tell you that HODs are caught between the two, but that goes with the territory.
     
  17. henriette

    henriette New commenter

    well I am not!
     
  18. It would be much less stressful to get your pupils to write their essays in English and ask your Assistant to translate them. Yes, I know a school where this happens and the results are said to be very good.. Not sure if they allow their pupls to read their CA Speaking, but it wouldn't surprise me.
     
  19. musiclover1

    musiclover1 New commenter

    That's one hard-working assistant!
     
  20. musiclover1

    musiclover1 New commenter

    What was the level of cheating like when we had coursework? I've never been in a school where pupils did coursework in MFL.
     

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