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Year 10 motivation

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by shades14, Apr 12, 2011.

  1. Hi, I am an NQT, and I have a year 10 group nearing the end of their coursework. I would say 30% of the class are working well and will achieve what I want them to for end of May. However, I have a small minority who have been absent for various reasons, and are very slow workers. The rest of them are capable, they just drag their heels every lesson now, I check their work, and they've done very little, I can't sit over every indiidual each lesson watching what they are doing, I find this situation difficult. I know they wernt good either with the previous teacher, by the standard of the work from their previous teacher, so I have inherited a class where some pupils are used to not working well.
    It's worrying me now, and I am wondering what approach to take when I go back after easter. Do I look for my head's guidance, which up to now hasn't been the best, as he's never around. Do I go for detentions all the way, what do I do. What would you do? can anyone advise me please?
     
  2. Hi, I am an NQT, and I have a year 10 group nearing the end of their coursework. I would say 30% of the class are working well and will achieve what I want them to for end of May. However, I have a small minority who have been absent for various reasons, and are very slow workers. The rest of them are capable, they just drag their heels every lesson now, I check their work, and they've done very little, I can't sit over every indiidual each lesson watching what they are doing, I find this situation difficult. I know they wernt good either with the previous teacher, by the standard of the work from their previous teacher, so I have inherited a class where some pupils are used to not working well.
    It's worrying me now, and I am wondering what approach to take when I go back after easter. Do I look for my head's guidance, which up to now hasn't been the best, as he's never around. Do I go for detentions all the way, what do I do. What would you do? can anyone advise me please?
     
  3. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    Treat this as a lesson learned. The summer time is the worst term to try to change behaviour but it's worth doing. Keep the heel-draggers in and tell them that they WILL be completing work set, either in lessons or detentions. Plan lessons where there is a reasonable amout ofwork to complete in the lesson and make it explicit that the expectation applies to everyone. Set extension work and give merits or whatever to those that make the effort. Make allowances for SEN: 'I know that you won't be able to finish all of this, but I expect ...' but tell them individually or maybe put a note in their books. Have high, but reasonable expectations.
    You will have planned when work should be completed beforehand. Have a spreadsheet or page in your markbook and tick every lesson for OK, something else for Good and codes for Detention, Finish for Homework etc. Again, make it very clear when the work is to be completed and follow through when they defy you. Because that's what they're doing. Check behaviour policy - in some schools, you'd refer to HOD after a break detention and after school but in others the HOD do after schools. If your detentions fail to change behaviour or if they don't turn up, refer to HOD saying that they are challenging you and you need to show them that there are consequences for this.
    If they still refuse to co-operate, I'd phone home. Do this after you've tried the detentions. Note in their books, 'Not complete', '20 mins writing', 'Not what you were asked to do' etc and show parents. Try to walk round and make notes in the last five mins of the lesson. Note good work and spend lesson time with good students. I'm the worl'd worst at this - at the beginning of every term, I have to remind myself to do more rewarding and less chasing.
    Turning behaviour round is hard - it takes a lot of time and you have to plan your lessons more carefully so that the slippery ones don't have an inch to wriggle with, 'I couldn't do that because ...' If you are resolute and fair, you can win with the majority and that will probably have to be good enough for this term. Good luck!
     
  4. Thanks GloriaSunshine, that's really sound advice, much better than the advice I got from my head incidently. When I approached him he was fine about it, supportive, but he didnt really give me any clear advice, I think he's just too busy to get involved unfortunately!!
     
  5. bettieblu

    bettieblu New commenter

    Good advice so far - I have always found setting targets, goals and expectations work well. Are the students aware of their FFT grades? Make them aware of these and also get them to set their own target grades - I usually keep a big colour chart/ grid on the wall for year 11 and 10 students showing all the target grades and then colour code where they are (eg amber = on target, red = below target, green = above target), they love checking where they are and it encourages their motivation as they challenge each other. Also, give them some form of reward when they do complete/ excel with their course/ class work - set class targets and prizes for the winner. The summer term, especially with the potentially hot weather can become de-motivational so we need to think of ways in which to encourage our little lovelies into the classroom.
    Good luck![​IMG]
     
  6. Really sound advice, thank you so much everybody x
     

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