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Year 1 Science help!

Discussion in 'Primary' started by ellie28, Sep 27, 2019.

  1. ellie28

    ellie28 New commenter

    Hi, in need of some advice please.
    I have a lesson observation coming up on Science and at the moment we are learning about our senses (Animals including humans unit)

    I have thought about having a carousel of activities to do with each sense eg smell pots, taste test. However I have no support and think this would be chaotic to manage! I’m thinking it might be better to concentrate on one of the senses.
    Any ideas greatly appreciated!
     
  2. DFC

    DFC New commenter

    I would do one sense.
    Whole class input for one smell modelled by you
    Then a carousel of other smells repeating you modelled input.
     
  3. DFC

    DFC New commenter

    *your
     
  4. ellie28

    ellie28 New commenter

    Thank you yes I think concentrating on one sense is best.
    Was also thinking of an investigation into most popular eye colour in class ... any done something similar?
     
  5. bonxie

    bonxie Senior commenter

    The most common eye colour wouldn't really be about using the senses.

    Continuing with the sense of smell activity, you could get the children to make a joint post-it note bar graph showing their favourite smells - a bit like this one:
    upload_2019-9-27_19-16-12.png
    Another smelling activity would be to spread the children out across the room/hall/playground and then spray some perfume, air freshener or food flavouring/essence (e.g. lemon, almond, mint put into a spray bottle) without the children being able to see exactly when you spray. Get the children to put their hand up when they can smell the perfume. Help them to realise that fragrances travel through the air and they can only smell them when the fragrance reaches their nose. You'll need to check for asthma/allergies before doing this activity.
     
  6. ellie28

    ellie28 New commenter

    Thanks lovely ideas, so would you have some smell pots on their tables and then they choose favourite smell and then make bar graph?

    Went down the most popular eye colour route as chn would need to use their sense of sight to identify eye colours of chn in their class ... however I do know what you mean!
     
  7. bonxie

    bonxie Senior commenter

    I usually put the smells in paper cups, cover them with paper, secure with an elastic band and then use a pin to make tiny holes in the covers. The paper covers are numbered so we all know which smell we're talking about. The children sniff a pot and say what they think the smell is. We discuss their different ideas. Each child gets a post-it to add to the column of the graph which shows the smell they liked most. We then talk about which smells were most/least popular etc.

    The smells I use include garlic, vinegar (on a ball of cotton wool so it doesn't splash about), coffee granules, ground cinnamon, ground ginger, lemon zest (or lemon juice on cotton wool balls), orange peel, dried lavender, fresh basil, mint leaves and whatever other spices or herbs I have at home. How many sets of pots I make depends on the number of pupils in the class.
     
    Last edited: Sep 27, 2019
  8. ellie28

    ellie28 New commenter

    I think that could work well and be engaging! Would chn do any of their own recording or would lesson end after discussion of bar chart? They’re Year 1
     
  9. bonxie

    bonxie Senior commenter

    I wouldn't normally get them to do their own bar chart if they've just contributed to the group one and discussed it. I tend involve the children in making a variety of bar charts (post-its notes, Lego brick towers, cubes etc) before introducing individual written recording.

    When you're doing the sense of touch, cardboard feely boxes are easy to make and the children enjoy trying to work out what's inside them. This could be a pinecone, Lego, conker, sponge, small teddy, bowl of jelly, cold spaghetti, slice of apple... The boxes could have a different item in each day.

    If you've got time to make them, small fabric feely bags tied with string work well too. You could put plastic shapes inside and get children to guess what's there or describe the shape to their partner who then has to name the shape. I number my feely bags so that I have the option to get children to record their ideas on a chart by drawing what they think the shape is in each numbered bag.

    A variation on sensing textures with their hands would be to get the children feeling things with their toes, e.g.fur fabric, net curtain, cardboard, a tray of gravel, jelly, wool, plastic scrubby things, felt, fruit netting. Good vocabulary work can come from their descriptions of what each texture feels like or reminds them of - especially if the activity is done seated and blindfolded.
     
  10. ellie28

    ellie28 New commenter

    Super ideas thanks!
     
  11. bonxie

    bonxie Senior commenter

  12. ellie28

    ellie28 New commenter

    For the smell lesson how can I make the key objectives really specific and ensure met?
    Also bringing in key scientific vocabulary?
     
  13. bonxie

    bonxie Senior commenter

    You'll need to look at the curriculum guidance for wherever you teach. The relevant part of the Scottish science curriculum is:
    I can identify my senses and use them to explore the world around me. SCN 0-12a
    Success criteria might include:
    • I can say which parts of my body are used for each of the senses, e.g. I hear with my ears.
    • I can use my senses to describe things around me, e.g. That feels rough/smooth/furry.
    • I can give examples of things I can see, hear, smell, taste and feel, e.g. I think that crisp is salt and vinegar flavour.
    This leads onto:
    I have explored my senses and can discuss their reliability and limitations in responding to the environment. SCN 1-12b
    Success criteria might include:
    • I can use my senses to detect information, e.g. I can use my sense of touch to work out what the object is in this bag. I can use my sense of hearing to work out the the timer has just finished.
    • I can explain how our sense keep us safe, e.g. Our sense of smell lets us know if something is on fire or milk has gone off. Our senses of hearing and sight help keep us safe on roads because we can use them to see/hear if cars are coming.
    • I can investigate how reliable my senses are, e.g. try putting one hand in warm water and one in cold, after a while put both hands in lukewarm water and notice that this water feels a different temperature to each hand, using taste tests, optical illusions and blind-fold games.
    This science benchmarking document from the Scottish Curriculum for Excellence might give you some ideas for success criteria that would fit the science content of your own curriculum.
    https://education.gov.scot/improvement/documents/sciencesbenchmarkspdf.pdf

    I've just done a quick Google for 'senses vocabulary kids science'. You might find something useful in the first links that came up:
    http://www.saps.org.uk/attachments/article/194/SAPS - Using Your Nose - smell activities.pdf
    https://www.******.co.uk/resource/t-m-202-five-senses-display-posters
    http://www.coreknowledge.org.uk/resources/Resource Pack- Science- Year 1- Human Body and Senses.pdf
     
  14. ellie28

    ellie28 New commenter

    Thanks a million for being so helpful!
     
  15. bonxie

    bonxie Senior commenter

    You're welcome. I hope your lesson observation goes well. :)
     

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