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Year 1 reading test

Discussion in 'Primary' started by tmtm, Feb 11, 2012.

  1. Would be interested to hear how other Year 1 teachers are preparing their children for this test.
    I have found with some of my children, they know their digraphs but do not always apply their knowledge to reading words and go back to saying each sound individually. Does anyone else find this?
    Does anyone know the pass mark for this test yet?
     
  2. Would be interested to hear how other Year 1 teachers are preparing their children for this test.
    I have found with some of my children, they know their digraphs but do not always apply their knowledge to reading words and go back to saying each sound individually. Does anyone else find this?
    Does anyone know the pass mark for this test yet?
     
  3. modgepodge

    modgepodge Established commenter

    I'm actually worried some of my best readers will fail it. They're so used to starting to decode a word then recognising what it must be from memory or using the sentence around it to work out what it must be, that when faced with a new word which they don't recognise and sounds like (and is) nonsense they just look a bit blank.
    Doing lots of "buried treasure" activities, and yesterday I just showed about 12 made up words on the board and told them they were nonsense and that they were to just decode them anyway. We read each word sounding the letters out, then I picked random kids to read words afterwards.
    I agree, lots of my low-mid ability will come across, e.g. dream and say "d-r-e-a-m". I then say "what sound does "ea" make and they go "Oh yeah. d-r-ea-m - dream." So they can do it but seem to approach new words on a letter by letter basis rather than checking to see if there's any digraphs in there. Any suggestions how to overcome this gratefully received!
     
  4. upsadaisy

    upsadaisy New commenter

    I have had this problem with the lower/SEN children mainly. They find segmenting and blending hard, so we play loads of games involving flash cards and segmenting and blending. I use cards with sound buttons on and sometimes I cover up parts of the word as we sound it out, so they can see the digraphs in isolation in the word. This seems to be helping them and we do other silly things like we made a rule for 'igh' that we never say 'i-g-h'.
     
  5. comenius

    comenius New commenter

    I'm not 'preparing' my children for the phonics screening just continuing to teach daily 30 minute phonic sessions.
     
  6. I suggest that children are helped with their reading when each child has his or her own cumulative bank of words to blend - and they do this as independently as possible - and on paper not through distractions like words in the sandpit.
    If the words are on paper, these can also be sent home - and can even be part of the reading practice at home.
    Where children are slower-to-learn, the more 'little and often' practice they have to blend words, the better. Once again, each child having his or her own permanent resources of words will help.
    You might try not using 'sound buttons'.
    What is it that prompts the reader to 'say the sounds' to discern the target word?
    It is a skim through the word from left to right to see if any letter groups are recognised. This is why it is an effective idea to use flash cards and grapheme tiles to teach letters and letter groups discretely some of the time.
    If sound buttons are used, these can be distractors. They are arguably unnecessary and take the reader's eyes away from looking through the word for any known letter groups.
    Jim Rose warned about 'extraneous activities' in his review of the teaching of reading - but, ironically, I suggest that even some ideas in Letters and Sounds are bordering on extraneous.
    As a training provider, we are frequently asked by schools for more ideas for 'fun games and activities' to ring the changes, I suppose, for staff and children.
    Sadly, I suggest that this is not what is going to be more effective - and that the point is to be very simple, core and routine with teaching alphabetic code knowledge and the three core skills and sub-skills - particularly for those slower-to-learn children.
     
  7. upsadaisy

    upsadaisy New commenter

    Perhaps I should point out that the cards I use have sound buttons one one side and not on the other side.
     

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