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Year 1 - phonics and literacy help please!

Discussion in 'Primary' started by jellybaby30, Sep 20, 2008.

  1. Hi I am new to Year 1 and not sure how to organise literacy and phoncis teaching. I would be grateful to hear how people organise their time. Do you keep literacy teaching and phonics separate? (i.e. teach separate lessons) or do you include it at the beginning of a literacy lesson. I am just about to start teaching my first unit of labels, lists and captions and at the same time start phonics teaching with them but am not sure how I go about doing this. Should phonics be taught for a set time each day - any advice would be greatly appreicated. I am starting to tear my hair out!


     
  2. Hi I am new to Year 1 and not sure how to organise literacy and phoncis teaching. I would be grateful to hear how people organise their time. Do you keep literacy teaching and phonics separate? (i.e. teach separate lessons) or do you include it at the beginning of a literacy lesson. I am just about to start teaching my first unit of labels, lists and captions and at the same time start phonics teaching with them but am not sure how I go about doing this. Should phonics be taught for a set time each day - any advice would be greatly appreicated. I am starting to tear my hair out!


     
  3. I'm new to year 1 too but at our school we keep 20 mins every afternoon specificially for phonics and then try and link in activities in reading time and 'free' time to do with phonics if we can. There guided activities might be based around the letter sound you have been doing. Can give you more detail of the sorts of things I do if you like


     
  4. Yes- phonics and literacy are different lessons. I do 15-20 mins of phonics first thing, using Jolly Phonics and Letters and Sounds.Then I send 2 groups of children to do a follow-up activity to do with the phonics topic, e.g. worksheet, bingo, track game, snap/memory, fishing words out, finding sounds in sand, matching sound cards to objects with that sound etc etc. While they are doing this, I take the 3rd group for guided reading for 15 mins, then start Literacy witht he whole class. Otherwise they would be sitting on the carpet for too long. Plus your phonics objective is more than likely completely different to your literacy objective! You definately need to do around 15 mins of phonics every day in year 1 as this is when the children are really starting to use and improve their phonic skills from reception. When you do this is up to you but I have found straight after register in the morn or after lunch good times. Hope that helps. xx
     
  5. I felt lost last year with phonics, as I was also new to year 1 but I actually really like teaching phonics now and find the children in my class are very responsive when we go outside to do our phonics sessions and hide graphemes in the bushes etc...

    Personally I think if you try to do your whole class literacy teaching as well as phonics together it means the children expected to concentrate for too long (especially Year 1 so early on in the year).I teach phonics as a separate session as my school a runs a 3 part morning and I usually get phonics done for 15 mins in the second session (straight after play and before assembly). The renewed framework also lends itself to being more flexible so you don't have to worry about doing it all in an 'hour' anymore. Some other teachers i work alongside do phonics straight after lunch or first thing in the morning and at this stage in Year 1 I sometimes need to break it up into 2 very short sections across the day - all depends on the kids and how long they seem tuned in! However, during 'literacy' sessions is is still important to encourage children to apply their knowledge of phonics through shared texts etc... When I am doing guided reading, I usually put out games linked to the phonics we are learning that week for other children to use- i'm sure you've been on ********** already for some fab resources, as well as letters in the sand/water, bingo games, playdough etc...

    In terms of time/coverage our literacy consultant said to ensure you recap previous graphemes/phonemes, to practice segmenting and blending and applying this when reading (moving onto writing later in the year) a sentence containing newly taught as well as known sounds daily. I try to incorporate these aspects across the day following the order of Letters and Sounds.

    Hope I have been of some use (and haven't confused you more) and good luck!
     
  6. tog

    tog

    I taught phonics last year in Reception using Letters and Sounds & JP, the children loved it and kept up with the fast pace without difficulty, except for a small group who needed extra support from my LSA once we'd covered Phase 3.

    However this year (different school) I have a Y1 class and am not sure where to start with the phonics - they did apparently follow Letters and Sounds last year but having done some initial assessments there are several children who need to start on Phase 2 (with lots of Phase 1 stuff as well), some who don't know the Phase 3 GPCs, lots who can't blend/segment without me almost doing it for them, and a small group who are ready for Phase 5.

    I am already struggling to fit everything in so cannot see how I can do daily phonics properly with 3 or 4 different groups, and if I do it as a class it won't be focused enough for it to be successful. I have no TA. How do other people manage this? Have suggested groups with the other KS1 classes - not happening at the moment (I will keep trying!) but meanwhile what would you suggest?
     
  7. Don't even try to do all those different groups - you'll go crazy trying.

    Do a phonics assessment to get an overall picture of the Alphabetic Code knowledge of your class.

    Then consider teaching them new material all at the same time and give activities to complete for which they need more, or less, support.

    Please look at the Sounds Book Activity Sheets of the free unit 1 of www.phonicsinternational.com for a structure which allows for differentiation whilst using the same activity sheet.

    These include a combination of simpler and longer words meaning that there is something for all levels in the class. Some children might only be able to sound out the letters and may need to hear someone else do this for them to 'hear' the target word - and others can read all the words independently.

    What matters is that you are fully aware that your pupils are accessing these activity sheets at different levels. Nevertheless, they will all make progress.

    When it comes to the spelling activity which they do on the 'folded up' part of the sheet, the adult in charge can select words for spelling and editing as appropriate to the children. You can still do this with a whole class at the same time. You just give a simple word to some children and then go on to give a more complex word to the others, then return to the slower-to-learn children - or use a teaching assistant to supervise one of the ability groups alongside you.

    Make your teaching arrangements as simple as possible, though. It is the same Alphabetic Code that all the children need to learn and the 'drip drip' teaching of every day will serve all the children well over time.
     

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