1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Year 1 children never done continous provision in Foundation 2

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by Weezy18, Sep 5, 2011.

  1. Weezy18

    Weezy18 New commenter

    I would appreacite people's advice and experience on this one! I started in my new school today, in Year 1. I found out on Friday that they have always been taught at tables in Foundation 2, no continous provision/free choice etc. They were told X is doing this and on this table. So today I thought I'd see how they got on with me allowing them to be independent in the areas while I worked with a group...disaster. They had no idea how to use the areas, not because it was a new classroom but because they had been used to such formal teaching. They just couldn't cope sitting on the carpet or in the areas as they are so used to doing everything sat at a table. They kept asking me when were they going to get work to do and asked for worksheets.
    The TA isn't much help either. She is very stuck in the old ways of teaching and isn't really helping matters. She doesn't like all the changes the new head has made/is making so I am having to deal with her too. Now, I can deal with her as it's being done my way now but the children have shocked me.
    So do I gradually introduce them to one area at a time, keep it more formal as they are used to be add more independence and less formal as the weeks pass, do I just plough on like I did today or what??
    In literacy I planned to have a group and the TA another while the others used the areas (enhanced) and then swap over groups...but they just couldn't manage it. Similar in maths.
    I've taught in KS1 for almost 9 years and have managed this area for the last 5 but I just feel totally bamboozled by these children. I can't and won't give them worksheets to do!
    Thanks!
     
  2. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I think you are going to have to model how to use the areas - a new one each day might work and perhaps set a task for them to complete until they get used to the idea of challenging themselves.
     
  3. Weezy18

    Weezy18 New commenter

    Yes, that's what I'm now thinking. I'll alter my planning to take this into account and build them up gradually. Thanks.
     
  4. I bet their parents won't be too happy to find out the structured curriculum they are used to has been replaced with bunfights in the different areas. Have you discussed any changes with the TA after all a lot of people need convincing as to the merits of the so called continuous provision,
     
  5. emilystrange

    emilystrange Star commenter

    has anyone had a word with the YR teacher? 0_0
     
  6. Weezy18

    Weezy18 New commenter

    Old Foundation 2 teacher has left as she didn't want to change how she had taught for the last 10 years and new head wanted to change things.
     
  7. emilystrange

    emilystrange Star commenter

    if she's got a new job, she will most likely get a hell of a shock, then. those poor kids.
     
  8. Weezy18

    Weezy18 New commenter

    Leading a foundation unit in another authority...
     
  9. She's not a war crimminal she just has a different philosophy to some of you. This forum is the most intolerant of dissenting views out of the whole TES site. Some of you are so blinkered and so utterly convinced of the wrongness of others. Depressing.
     
  10. emilystrange

    emilystrange Star commenter

    if i read the OP correctly, this reception teacher has, for the last 10 years, been teaching in a way that opposes EYFS research, good practice, policy, training... enough, i think, not to be overly impressed?
     
  11. Well said! I am utterly amazed that this kind of teaching in Foundation Stage has still been accepted by advisers etc, but my philosophy is that children need to do some directed tasks or they are not prepared for school. We find that the EY advisers would have no Guided Reading/Writing etc, and would have continuous provision all the time, but the English consultants want loads of direction! There are not enough chairs for children in my room, and I like to think that my timetable allows a balance of direction/teaching and child-initiated play, but we have introduced more structure over the last year (from a very very fluid approach), and so far, it seems to have worked for those who have moved to year one this year. Back to the OP, I would introduce areas one at a time, and perhaps have play-based activities on the tables so that the children can think they are 'working' if that is their association with the table. I'd be interested to know how the teacher managed all the children completing a worksheet at once when perhaps on entry to Reception they couldn't hold a pencil!
     
  12. emilystrange

    emilystrange Star commenter

    we have the same, bumblebee111. but we have YR/1/2, so continuous provision goes all the way through KS1.
    i was wondering what level of evidence was actually CI?
     
  13. I think it's supposed to be 80% from CI and 20% directed for Reception. I am undecided on my opinion on this though!
     
  14. InkyP

    InkyP Star commenter

    It's not like that in our LA and the Curriculum Guidance suggests a balance of teacher directed and CI. We certainly have guided writing here. I would like more tables and chairs but, for reasons of space, we can't have them.
     
  15. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Provision should provide a balance but evidence for the profile should be 80-20
    HOW MUCH TIME TO PLAY?
    Sue Ellis of the National Strategies is keen to dispel the myth that children must now spend 80 per cent of their time playing.
    The idea arose from the EYFS assessment document, which states that evidence should come 80 per cent from child-initiated and 20 per cent from adult-led activities. But there is no such rule. Basically, one-third of the day should be spent on adult-initiated and two-thirds on child- initiated activities, half of which is spent playing alongside adults.

     

Share This Page