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Year 1 boys and rough play

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by Quin, Jan 25, 2011.

  1. I am at my wits end with the majority of the boys in my Year 1 class and their rough play.

    I understand that rough and tumble is a part of playground life, but unfortunately the majority of my parents are VERY protective of their own child and I am getting constant e-mails and phonecalls from parents demanding that I deal with the rough play.
    I can spend up to 1-2 hours of my teaching time about 2-3 times a week speaking to individuals involved getting to the bottom of it, offering strategies about how to deal with it in future, administering warnings and consequences and then phoning parents as they demand notification that I have dealt with it adequately.
    My TA's are very good and at playtime are watching the particular group of boys (about 12 of them) like hawks so that they can intervene if the game gets out of hand. It starts off as a game and then when a child feels it's not going their way or it starts to get out of control they will complain that 'X pushed me/poked me/kicked me' when they happily participated in the game up until then.
    They have little wrestling games, pull each other around by their coats, push each other, take their hands to someone elses throats, kick, hit. Now most of this is just simple childs play but then they take it too far .... and then they go home and complain to parents who then get angry at me and say I am not doing a good enough job to take care of their child. When in fact their child happily entered the game knowing what would happen as we have warned them againts it in class but parents will not accept that their child has gone against advice and have made a bad choice.

    It has escalated more than usual since a new child joined the class who is particularly physical and has little awareness of how to be gentle and personal space.

    <u>We tried a lot of things last term that have lost their impact</u>
    - assemblies on playing nicely
    - class circle time
    - reminding children if they are worried/hurt/upset by a game to stop playing it and tell an adult
    - we then took the approach of 'no play fighting/pretend fighting/real fighting' which worked for some time.
    - tell an adult straight away on the playground if you have been hurt so that they get to the bottom of it
    - reminding them of the whole school playground rules
    - a couple of stories about playing nice (but to be honest when the story is about an elephant or bear its hard for them to relate to it or get the meaning behind it!)
    - used our warning and sanction system
    - rewards/stickers for those children playing nicely
    <u>I still want to try the following</u>
    - being gentle/playing nicely social story written specifically for the class
    - taking the group of boys and spending time talking to them specifically
    - individuals missing playtime if seen playing rough

    Any help or ideas are appreciated!

    Quin

     
  2. I am at my wits end with the majority of the boys in my Year 1 class and their rough play.

    I understand that rough and tumble is a part of playground life, but unfortunately the majority of my parents are VERY protective of their own child and I am getting constant e-mails and phonecalls from parents demanding that I deal with the rough play.
    I can spend up to 1-2 hours of my teaching time about 2-3 times a week speaking to individuals involved getting to the bottom of it, offering strategies about how to deal with it in future, administering warnings and consequences and then phoning parents as they demand notification that I have dealt with it adequately.
    My TA's are very good and at playtime are watching the particular group of boys (about 12 of them) like hawks so that they can intervene if the game gets out of hand. It starts off as a game and then when a child feels it's not going their way or it starts to get out of control they will complain that 'X pushed me/poked me/kicked me' when they happily participated in the game up until then.
    They have little wrestling games, pull each other around by their coats, push each other, take their hands to someone elses throats, kick, hit. Now most of this is just simple childs play but then they take it too far .... and then they go home and complain to parents who then get angry at me and say I am not doing a good enough job to take care of their child. When in fact their child happily entered the game knowing what would happen as we have warned them againts it in class but parents will not accept that their child has gone against advice and have made a bad choice.

    It has escalated more than usual since a new child joined the class who is particularly physical and has little awareness of how to be gentle and personal space.

    <u>We tried a lot of things last term that have lost their impact</u>
    - assemblies on playing nicely
    - class circle time
    - reminding children if they are worried/hurt/upset by a game to stop playing it and tell an adult
    - we then took the approach of 'no play fighting/pretend fighting/real fighting' which worked for some time.
    - tell an adult straight away on the playground if you have been hurt so that they get to the bottom of it
    - reminding them of the whole school playground rules
    - a couple of stories about playing nice (but to be honest when the story is about an elephant or bear its hard for them to relate to it or get the meaning behind it!)
    - used our warning and sanction system
    - rewards/stickers for those children playing nicely
    <u>I still want to try the following</u>
    - being gentle/playing nicely social story written specifically for the class
    - taking the group of boys and spending time talking to them specifically
    - individuals missing playtime if seen playing rough

    Any help or ideas are appreciated!

    Quin

     
  3. Playing nicely and being gentle are a bit too vague for such young ones. I'd get specific about particular actions.
    Kicking. Is. Absolutely. Forbidden.
    The only thing one is allowed to kick is a ball. There are no gradations. There's no judgement about whether any particular kick is too 'rough' or 'not fair' or anything else.
    This is much easier to identify and intervene on. And for supervision, it's a lot easier to step in when the action itself is the issue rather than its severity or its manner. Any instance, instant exclusion from the playground for the rest of the break.
    A couple of weeks of sharp focus and immediate response on this one, you can add another action to the repertoire. Hands to the throat would be my pick. Any instance of either action, instant exclusion from the playground for the rest of the break.
     
  4. I was just logging on to pretty much write the same message as in the first post!
    Focussing in on very specific rules seems like a great idea. Has this worked for you in the past?
    I have a small group of P1 (YR) children who also insist on making their playtimes as physical as possible. I'll try this tactic!
     
  5. Not for me personally. But for 9 years my office door and glass wall was one metre away from the play area of a childcare centre.
    Some carers were much more effective than others at dealing with the 4-5 year old group. I learnt a lot.
     

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