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Y5 - bad behaviour - please give ideas.

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by 3209suzanne, Oct 4, 2011.

  1. Hi
    I have a very disjointed class of Y5 pupils. Of course some of them are lovely - however others have behavioural issues that are well known within the school.
    This year group has caused problems since it was in KS1 and the issues have changed and grown as they have grown. So, this trouble is not new to the school but it is new to me in Y5 (I've always been a KS1 teacher before so I am also learning to teach UKS2)
    The 2 main protaganists are both very wilfull and like to be the centre of attention - they also hate each other with a vengeance and once they start neither seems capable of stopping going off at the other.
    The main problems are back chatting and refusing to be quiet - ever - even for a second - they both, independently of each other, make noises, comments to get others to join them, find everything funny, etc you know the stuff - but there are soooo many others in the class who are happy to help them carry on that I am having trouble getting whole class attention to give learning a chance.
    PE the other day was a nightmare as 8 children were refusing to cooperate in any way.
    We use detention as a deterrent during play and lunchtime - or short staying in, an in class detention with the teacher for a smaller misdemeanor. I see some parents after school and can report issues to them, another has a home/school book and another is on report card which seems to make his behaviour worse not better as he sees the whole world is against him.
    We have house points and praise for good behaviour and work.
    Please give me ideas for how to have a class presence and tips to gain control when things are slipping - and how do others cope with a class who finds it impossible to be silent???
     
  2. Hi
    I have a very disjointed class of Y5 pupils. Of course some of them are lovely - however others have behavioural issues that are well known within the school.
    This year group has caused problems since it was in KS1 and the issues have changed and grown as they have grown. So, this trouble is not new to the school but it is new to me in Y5 (I've always been a KS1 teacher before so I am also learning to teach UKS2)
    The 2 main protaganists are both very wilfull and like to be the centre of attention - they also hate each other with a vengeance and once they start neither seems capable of stopping going off at the other.
    The main problems are back chatting and refusing to be quiet - ever - even for a second - they both, independently of each other, make noises, comments to get others to join them, find everything funny, etc you know the stuff - but there are soooo many others in the class who are happy to help them carry on that I am having trouble getting whole class attention to give learning a chance.
    PE the other day was a nightmare as 8 children were refusing to cooperate in any way.
    We use detention as a deterrent during play and lunchtime - or short staying in, an in class detention with the teacher for a smaller misdemeanor. I see some parents after school and can report issues to them, another has a home/school book and another is on report card which seems to make his behaviour worse not better as he sees the whole world is against him.
    We have house points and praise for good behaviour and work.
    Please give me ideas for how to have a class presence and tips to gain control when things are slipping - and how do others cope with a class who finds it impossible to be silent???
     
  3. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    That sounds tough, because it sounds like you're doing a lot of the right things.
    1. You could easily escalate this; repeated misdemeanours adds up to felonies, and if a pupil still persists in misbehaviour after a sanction, then you're in your rights to escalate the sanction. And that includes up to exclusion and beyond. Sometimes some pupils manage themselves out of the system, and it isn't your fault, just like some doctors lose a patient. But exclusions are meant to be a last ditch measure before permanent exclusion, so use them as you would any other strategy. It might be just what these boys need to make them realise that their oafishness won't be tolerated any longer. Maybe they've been handled too softly in the past?
    2. Arrange some kind of alternative provision for these boys; working outside the Head's office, perhaps, or in monitored isolation. They have placed themselves beyond the tribe when they ruin a classroom, and the rest of the class deserves better. You'll probably find a big difference when they're not in the room.
    3. They don't need more praise; it sounds like they need some boundaries in their lives. In fact, given that one of them feels that the world's against him, I suspect this quite strongly.
    Good luck
    Read more from Tom here on his personal blog, or follow him on Twitter here.
     

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