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Y13 literature closed book advice

Discussion in 'English' started by readingsez78, Feb 27, 2012.

  1. This is my first time round with Y13 literature and I was hoping for some words of wisdom regarding how to help prepare students for the closed book element of the exam. I have a gifted class who are really struggling with how to best prepare for this and I'm struggling to help them.

    What are the best ways to remember quotations? Which quotations would be best? Should the focus be gothic only or other interpretations...

    I'm doing AQA B and I've done Dracula, Dr Faustus and The Bloody Chamber.

    Thank you in advance for your support.
     
  2. This is my first time round with Y13 literature and I was hoping for some words of wisdom regarding how to help prepare students for the closed book element of the exam. I have a gifted class who are really struggling with how to best prepare for this and I'm struggling to help them.

    What are the best ways to remember quotations? Which quotations would be best? Should the focus be gothic only or other interpretations...

    I'm doing AQA B and I've done Dracula, Dr Faustus and The Bloody Chamber.

    Thank you in advance for your support.
     
  3. gruoch

    gruoch Occasional commenter

    It's elements of the gothic. No text is purely gothic, so you need to look at how they do and do not conform. 'Faustus' can't really be described as a gothic text as the genre is much later, for instance.
    You must look at other interpretations. This element is 25% of the marks and, for a good mark, evaluate their strengths and weaknesses.
    Look at context, but please don't get too bogged down in 'historical' context. There are lots of other ways of addressing context which are far more interesting, but I'd focus on literary context as it ties in nicely with the focus of the whole module. Don't say that Angela Carter was living 'in a patriarchal society'. 'Bloody Chamber is around 1980, long after Germaine Greer, Betty Friedan and the equal pay act. Women even had the vote and, horror of horrors, jobs!
    The best way to remember quotations is to learn them. And not to pick the most obvious/shocking. Markers are neither impressed nor shocked when candidates pick the Carter quotes simply because they have the C word in them or go into great detail about the orgy scene in 'Dracula'.
     
  4. Thanks for the advice grouch. I was hoping there was some sort of magic wand to get quotations into their heads but I had a feeling just learning them was the only way forward!
    Out of interest do you ask them to find their own/the ones they feel are significant or do you give them ceratin quotations to get them started and then ask them to gather more?
    Thanks again.


     
  5. gruoch

    gruoch Occasional commenter

    Your best bet is to look at the questions for your texts on past papers. That should give you a pretty good idea about where to concentrate on looking for quotes. Look at the examiner's reports, too. The person who writes those also sets the questions, so pick out her positive comments when it comes to close reference to texts.
     
  6. You need multi purpose quotes. Look at past papers, plan out how you would have answered the questions and which quotes would be most useful. The ones that come up again and again are the must haves. Learn quotes by rote. Say them, chant them, get them up on the wall and show the kids what do do with them. I despair at the number of pupils who learn reams of quotes and then do nothing more than use them to tell the story.
     
  7. mediadave

    mediadave New commenter

    Sign up to www.quizlet.com and make some quote flashcards which the students can use to learn their quotes; the different quizzes will help them remember them all.
     
  8. Which quotes to learn? The ones that support what you want to say.
    It's the old "You can say anything you want about a literary text provided you can support what you're saying with material from the text". If a pupil has an idea about a text, there must be something in the text which supports that idea, otherwise the idea is not legitimate - in the rules of this game called Lit Crit.
    It follows then that pupils must, as they are studying, come up with quotations and references to support their ideas. If they have come up with the ideas - or at least have espoused them - and have found the supporting quotations themselves - then they are more likely to remember them.
     
  9. sleepyhead

    sleepyhead New commenter

    I get mine to do 90% of their essays closed book in preparation. We do quotation races and play all sorts of silly games, and we make podcasts.
     

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