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Y12 and 13 form tutor

Discussion in 'NQTs and new teachers' started by Fleur_anglaise, Aug 24, 2012.

  1. Hi folks.

    I'm just about to start my NQT year, and will be the main tutor for a mixed Y12 and 13 form group. I was just wondering if anyone had any general advice about this age? I worked with 6th formers several times at university but didn't get much experience in my PGCE year (one Y13 student - I teach MFL!). Was also wondering if anyone has any ideas about what could be done with form times? Thanks!
     
  2. Hi folks.

    I'm just about to start my NQT year, and will be the main tutor for a mixed Y12 and 13 form group. I was just wondering if anyone had any general advice about this age? I worked with 6th formers several times at university but didn't get much experience in my PGCE year (one Y13 student - I teach MFL!). Was also wondering if anyone has any ideas about what could be done with form times? Thanks!
     
  3. Are you in contact with anyone in the school? If so can you speak to
    someone and get the email of the head of sixth form or whoever has
    responsibility for what happens in form time?

    The reason I suggest
    this is because schools utilise year 12 & 13 form time for all
    kinds of different things, and they might have a programme you can/are
    expected to follow.



    Some may disagree with this, but in
    terms of general advice, I would keep the focus broadly academic, rather
    than 'fun.' This means you use the time for mentoring, getting to know
    the students as quickly as possible so you can support them in their
    studies. It is likely you will have some responsibility for UCAS forms,
    and so you will want to spend time working on and towards these
    applications, as well as doing careers advice, especially easy If you
    have computers in your form room.

    In the beginning, as you have a
    split year 12/13 group, you may want to get your year 13's to do
    postcards for the year 12's on the theme of, 'What I wish I'd known
    about being an A-level student last year.' You can also buddy up
    students who are doing similar subjects. The mini Independent newspaper
    'I' only costs 20p, 5 copies of that, distributed and they have to
    summarise an article they found interesting in 50 words, then discuss
    it. (Good practice for note-taking, comprehension and keeping up to date
    with current affairs.) If you want to go for something more relaxed,
    knowledge quizzes and dingbats are safe bets. I've got a set of Papier Mache Chests that I've spray painted red that I use for games of 'Deal or
    No-Deal?' But you could do the same with envelopes and monopoly money.


    To some extent you need to be realistic and play it by ear. It
    really depends on your group, as you could find getting them to do some
    research around one of their subjects is mighty ambitious, or find that
    you have them inviting their own guest speakers for debates. (The former
    is much more likely!). Attendance is one of your main responsibilities,
    and you need to be chasing up absence accordingly (your fellow A-level
    teachers will appreciate you for it.) I would ring and introduce myself
    to the parents in the first week [second is fine!]. Just a brief
    phone call to introduce yourself, and let them know how to contact you if
    needed. This will make it much easier for you to contact them in future
    if/when necessary.

    Early Impressions count. If you let them sit
    on their phones having a chat for the first week because you're snowed
    under with the myriad things you've got to organise, you'll probably
    struggle to get them to treat form time seriously. Of course, you're
    goal isn't to come across as strict or unreasonable, but remember you
    are their teacher, not their friend. Remind yourself that you job is to
    support them in achieving their potential, and you can't go far wrong.

    Best of luck!
     

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