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Y10 - very challenging

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by kez145, Nov 11, 2011.

  1. I hope someone can help. I am an NQT at a new school. My y10 class are becoming very challenging. They are very talkative and this is resulting in a lot of wasted time while I wait to start my lesson. I know I can't expect every pupil to like me; however, I am finding it increasingly difficult as pupils challenge me when I give them warnings claiming 'I haven't done anything' etc etc. Also, this week pupils have taken to asking for a good teacher, one who is qualified and has a degree. This is really hurtful. Any suggestions for how I can regain control and get through to them? I use the school policy and have taken to ringing parents. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. I hope someone can help. I am an NQT at a new school. My y10 class are becoming very challenging. They are very talkative and this is resulting in a lot of wasted time while I wait to start my lesson. I know I can't expect every pupil to like me; however, I am finding it increasingly difficult as pupils challenge me when I give them warnings claiming 'I haven't done anything' etc etc. Also, this week pupils have taken to asking for a good teacher, one who is qualified and has a degree. This is really hurtful. Any suggestions for how I can regain control and get through to them? I use the school policy and have taken to ringing parents. Thanks in advance.
     
  3. chicabonita

    chicabonita New commenter

    Y10s can be absolute buggers. My very first Y10 class had me in tears and dreading school. I ended up having behaviour support in those lessons- is that an option for you?
    If it isn't, you're going to have to be absolutely ruthless, and they will hate you for a while and probably try to break you. Is your HoD or another more senior member of staff willing to help you for a few lessons? What I would suggest is a short-term 'shock' tactic where the fear of God is put into them, and they are reminded that they are vile little twerps.
    This should merit some sort of isolation from your lesson. It's really serious- please don't let it go. IMO it's as bad as swearing at you.
    As a second part, go back to basics- warning 1, 2, 3 (or whatever your policy says) then bam, you're not behaving acceptably therefore you have this sanction. If they argue, increase it. Don't let them off anything. You need to be supported by your colleagues because it would help if you could park the worst offenders and they get another reminder that unacceptable behaviour has serious consequences- a bullocking rather than a soft lesson in the back of Sir's class!
    I do feel a bit edgy advising you, because since coming back from mat leave I've struggled somewhat- but this type of tactic does work. You MUST be ruthless in enforcing whatever your sanction is, though- and ringing parents is good too. Also positive phone calls or something similar, for those who are behaving properly, is another useful tactic and lets those pupils see that you notice and appreciate them.
    Do you ever have them before lunch, break, or at the end of the day? They make the time up then (you can write the message on the board and keep adding minutes until they get the message). If you're confident you can keep the noisy ones (and are sure who they are) then the good quiet ones could leave on time. If that would allow noisy ones to escape or would make things worse, then keep the whole class. Once, I booked a small IT room for the few who behaved themselves and they got a free lesson in there while the rest wrote grammar from the books (again, though, that needs support from your colleagues as someone would have to keep an eye on them).
    Anyway- good luck. Please bear in mind that it's not you, it's them. Call on your colleagues and really insist that they help you stamp this out. Especially such appalling rudeness (I also hope you told their parents what they've been saying).

     
  4. revisionstation

    revisionstation New commenter

    Hiyah
    Year 10's can be a nightmare, especially at the moment when they have lots of controlled assessments and module exams, any lesson where they are not required to sit in silenece they will use as an opportunity to chat.
    Here are a couple of tips worth a try
    * poster of the school rules LARGE behind your head or on the wall, point to it to remind them they are breaking the rules. When they break the rules e.g. not repecting the staff (you) then point and ask them what rule they are breaking, wait for them to tell you. This works best when only one person is chatting, if the whole room is noisy then this won't work.
    * try a very quick quiz at the start, a very professional start to the lesson get them in sat down then straight in - they won't have time to get lary because they will want to win - make sure you have some great prize. Those messing about get warnings then can't win the prize. You only have to do this for 2 weeks to get their attention, and you can scale down the prize to a 1p chew.
    * make a fuss with your HOD, SMT and anyone else, they need to know you need support. They are paid BIG money to SUPPORT you so make them earn it. I battled with a group for a year when other NQT's were not even asked to take this group as they were too challenging and I realised that I should have asked for help it wasn't just going to happen and my HOD could not guess that I was having a bad time.
    * identify the ring leaders and keep data, keep on at the parents and get them in for a conference. BUT keep lots and lots of data, your observations, late to lesson, no work done, rude, out of seat. etc etc
    * get your HOD to put the worst on depeartment report to them
    * if you are taking break times e.g. mins on the board the make sure they NEVER make the time up. You can never come back from this. Be firm. Stand your ground, you are teflon and they have only words. They will respect you for it.
    * start from day 1 again, first activity they write out YOUR class rules and get each and every one to sign them. Take them in at the end and look through them gravely - they cannot go to lunch / break etc until you have approved their work.
    * Put these rules posters on the walls take everything else down. Next lesson reinforce with the same posters "now Billy what is the rule about spitting / shouting / yelling out / ?" Let them know what they should be doing. "You should sit up nice and straight then you will be read to take part in this fantastic acttivity...." and when Billy sits right heap heap heap the praise " well done Billy that's great you are working well".
    * make sure all lessons start the same on time, on the discipline, expect the highest standards of behaviour an accept nothing less. They will meet your standards, but it may take time for them to get there.
    * do give detentions and NEVER let them make it up, if you don't they will mess you about forever show backbone and they know they cannot swing the lead because you will enforce the rules each and every lesson.
    * Ask to sit in on other teacher's lessons and pick up tips of what works well with this group. You will find they will be a different group for some teachers, why is this, are there any techniques you can transfer?
    I hope things get better for you, sound like you are already starting to tackle things by looking for help on a forum is a good step.
    One last thing, you won't win with every group or every student there are a few who will make you want to tear you hair out. Each year you teach you get wiser and the kids get to know you.
    Any problems or if you just want to natter e-mail me direct: Sarah revisionstation@hotmail.co.uk

     
  5. joedoggyuk

    joedoggyuk New commenter

    I'm drunk, Big brother's big brother is blaring in the background--not my choice of TV, my step mum has the TV remote--and I'm reading the TES. Wild times!
    I wasn't going to write anything, but some of the advice given verges on suggesting whole class detentions. Don't. Do. This. It's committing Hari-Kari. Not all the kids will be bad, and whole-class detentions highlight to the class either your inability to discern who is doing wrong, or your cowardice in failing to discriminating against those who do wrong. Do this and it won't be a few kids being a pain, the whole class will turn on you.
    So--what not to do discussed. Now, what to do:
    1. Set the routine for this class of them coming in, copying the date, title, aim into their exercise books, and a few simple can-do starter questions. This frees you to settle them, dish pens out, deal with late comers and take the register.
    The devil makes work for idle hands, but if they have a pen in their hand and a title to copy down, they may just be godly.
    Ideally, you'd like to have them stood behind their chairs ready in silence at the start of the lesson. You'd say "good morning year ten" and your ears would ring with the synchronised replied melody of "Good morning Mr Joedoggyuk". Hang on, I need another Stella. No cold ones. Anyway, you can only do this when you're strong with a class. If you're weak with a class I'm not suggesting being passive, but don't go in guns blazing: you'll loose. Fight the fights you'll win and those you think you might win. Fight every thing that's wrong and you'll drown with this class.

    Set them a detention for this--a good hour. Give them work, hard work; the kind of work they are incapable of doing. Wait for them to sweat or get it wrong, then step in, teach them how it's done, and have them answer some more questions they can now answer. This promotes two things about you: you know your stuff and they can learn hard stuff off you.
    Don't mention what they said about you being a bad teacher during the detention. If you try to discuss it you'll look weak, you'll look like you care what they think. Brush it off. Just get them doing work, and make sure they do the whole hour.
    That beer should be cold by now.
     
  6. Thank you for all of your kind words and advice. Sometimes it is difficult to remain objective and at times I have been thinking that their behaviour is as a result of something I am doing. I will definitely try some of the things that have been mentioned; in particular, ensuring that I have the support of senior members of staff. The class are very up and down and some lessons they can be great, so it is very frustrating. I am going to ask for support when it comes to keeping students in as some students just ignore detentions and I end up chasing everything up. The biggest problem is getting the class to be quiet so I can tell them what to do. This is why certain members of the class feel they can make personal comments. I manage to get one section of the room quiet and another table will start up again. Thanks again. I really do appreciate it.
    Kez145
     
  7. Tom_Bennett

    Tom_Bennett Occasional commenter

    All you need is to persevere, and to Hell with what they say. With a new class, you might get a brief period of angelic behaviour as they sniff you out, then the behaviour deteriorates, then it plateaus for a while as you battle some of their inconsideracies.
    This, I suspect is where you are right now, and it's a very crucial moment, because it's now that most NQTs make the cardinal mistake: they change course, or they give up, or they stop doing anything and focus on surviving rather than improving.
    If you had started out on a jog to John O' Groats, would you stop after a few days because you 'hadn't got there yet?' Of course not; no one would expect such a result so soon. Yet in teaching we often expect relationships to spring into life ex nihilo. Well, they don't. And now some of the kids have decided that they don't like this new chap telling them to answer questions and make mind maps etc. So they're wriggling ; they're writhing; they're rocking your boat and seeing what you'll do.
    So do the right thing, and keep following the school policies; keep laying down the law, and keep dishing out the justice, rough or otherwise. Eventually all but the toughest nuts will crack. It is essential, thought, that you enlist the school to assist you when some of them stubbornly refuse to see the magnificence of your benevolent will. Escalate when you need to, and don't let any of the slippery little fish slip through your net. The certainty, as Bill Rogers says, of a punishment is more important than the severity of the punishment.
    You regain control by keeping your head. Don't change the rules, don't start handing out marbles in a jar or any of that rubbish; score sheets, star charts and high-fives. They're being rude to you and they need to learn that's not on. They will never learn properly if they can't adhere to your rules. Keep ringing parents. Keep applying pressure. Eventually, like Jurassic ferns turning to black gold, the force you apply will turn your coal to rough diamonds.
    Good luck
    Read more from Tom here on his personal blog, or follow him on Twitter here.
     

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