1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Y10 how to make them listen!

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by lucylocket87, Sep 27, 2012.

  1. I'm an NQT and have just taken over two year 10 classes who have been following the NVQ course for the last year, and have now been made to switch to GCSE. They cannot even introduce themselves in French, and sit there and eat sweets, refuse to even take their books out of their bags, walk around, do their hair/makeup and swear loudly across the classroom. they have all told me in no uncertain terms that the loathe having to do French and do not care whether they fail! This is two entire classes! HELP!
     
  2. I'm an NQT and have just taken over two year 10 classes who have been following the NVQ course for the last year, and have now been made to switch to GCSE. They cannot even introduce themselves in French, and sit there and eat sweets, refuse to even take their books out of their bags, walk around, do their hair/makeup and swear loudly across the classroom. they have all told me in no uncertain terms that the loathe having to do French and do not care whether they fail! This is two entire classes! HELP!
     
  3. Dragonlady30

    Dragonlady30 Star commenter


    Have a look at the other thread ref year 10s. There are some good points there which you might find useful.
    Good luck.
     
  4. You must involve senior management.
    It's not unloading your problem onto someone else, it's seeking support.
    How the SMT responds should indicate whether you have any chance of success.
     
  5. Dunteachin

    Dunteachin Star commenter

    No doubt your lovely HOD gave you those classes! Let's face it, no-one else in the department would have wanted them... It was mean of him/her to give you two groups, as well.
    So, enlist the HOD's help with detentions, calls home, etc etc.
    This is going to be a tough one for you! You'll have to try and find out what they're interested in and see if you can tailor activities to that, using French videos, music, films. There's some good stuff in Resources on here.
    Bonne chance! .....and don't blame yourself!
     
  6. pepper5

    pepper5 Star commenter

    I agree 100% with the poster who said you must have senior managment involved.
    I think it is disgraceful that these two classes were given to you without any provision for back up or team teaching or any support. These classes sound as though they would be tough for even experienced teachers.
    You oviously inherited these groups and they did not learn to get away with the behaviour you describe overnight.
    Of course set your rules and apply sanctions, but I think you will need support - anybody would.
     
  7. I
    am just completing my NQT and had a similar experience (though not as extreme),
    last year. It is really hard to ask for help because you think you are
    'failing' somehow. The truth of the matter is, is that the school is
    there to support you throughout and the longer you leave it the more the
    students will rebel and lose any respect they have of you.




    Right
    now you’re their new teacher and they will 'test' you anyway they can so you
    need to act. Don’t look at asking for help as a weakness think more that its
    the next behavioural step. List the strategies you have tried and explain
    them to your head of department. I would hope that they would either
    suggest themselves doing something or suggest senior management
    involvement. I would also set after school detentions to get the lessons
    complete that they miss. This is a brilliant way for them to realise that no
    matter what, the lesson WILL happen and if not during school time then in their
    own personal time. They soon get the message!





    Additionally,
    phone calls, texts, letters etc to parents keeping them in the loop and getting
    them onside, everyone wants their child to succeed etc that after all is what
    you want. Can I also suggest that when you do get this to turn around (and you
    will), that you still involve the parents, calls home explaining how well their
    child is doing will only encourage behaviour and learning progression.





    Go
    in hard, don’t go for the softly softly approach. Stay determined; track
    those causing the main issues (there’s always one or two that as soon are taken
    out of the room the rest calm down) and get management involved!





    Good
    luck!



     
  8. shamsh

    shamsh Occasional commenter

    Would you seriously say the same thing if the subject in question was, for example, English, Maths or Science?

    It sounds like there are probably a lot of school politics going on behind the scenes and you ended up with the classes that other people didn't want (as another post mentions). Be really tough and consistent with your sanctions, and insist that senior management and HOD back you up. They probably know they've messed up on some level by switching courses about. Their excuse that they can't even introduce themselves in French because they were doing NVQ is frankly pathetic and reinforcing the horrendous stereotype that the British cannot be bother to learn other languages "because everyone else speaks English don't they Miss, so what's the point."

    Are a lot of these students struggling with literacy in English? Learning French (or any other language) can often help as it helps them understand the way their own language works, and focussing on speaking and listening will build their confidence so that they hopefully begin to feel more comfortable with the written side.

    Good luck!
     
  9. Thankyou to (almost) everyone who has posted in reply to this. I am going to go to the HOD first thing tomorrow and seek some support regarding these classes and am going to ask other staff if they hav any tips to share! its nice to have some support and know its not just me being a terrible teacher!
     
  10. shamsh: yes, of course

    lucylocket87:

    I gave you sincere moral advice, although my response seems to have been removed?

    Note the irony in the situation. Even though you are not listening to my advice, I am not going to try to punish or hurt you. On the contrary my perfectly polite and decorous response gets removed. But if one of your pupils doesn't want to listen to you, you want to punish them and hurt them and you post on a forum seeking validation for doing so and practical tips on how to do it in the most unpleasant and coercive ways. This is a major moral difference between this forum situation and the situation you have chosen and continue to choose for yourself.

    It really is morally wrong to work in a conventional school. You should get out now while you are still young. Why would you want to be an object of loathing? I'm sure you don't, but in as far as you are one it is with good reason. Don't waste your life.
     
  11. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    Some of my year 10s think that.
     

Share This Page