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Writing/giving a speech for a leaving colleague?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by chloejewel, Jul 16, 2012.

  1. chloejewel

    chloejewel New commenter

    I've been asked to give a speech for a colleague who is leaving for another school this week. I've never made a speech in front of adults before and haven't a clue where to start. Does anyone have a foolproof structure or ideas on how to make it interesting, funny and memorable?

    Thanks!
     
  2. chloejewel

    chloejewel New commenter

    I've been asked to give a speech for a colleague who is leaving for another school this week. I've never made a speech in front of adults before and haven't a clue where to start. Does anyone have a foolproof structure or ideas on how to make it interesting, funny and memorable?

    Thanks!
     
  3. lilachardy

    lilachardy Star commenter

    I did it like a true/false quiz about the person in question.
    Lots of silly things she had done, and lots of silly things she hadn't done! To make it easier for me, I made a mini-book with it all in, so I could just read it out. And then she had something to take away to remember it by.
    I got the staff listening to do the Fingers (for false) and Thumbs (for true) thing, like you do in class.
    That's my secret ID blown!

    It doesn't have to be a serious speech, as long as you thank them and say how amazing they are!
     
  4. Don't exceed 2/3 minutes, try to be funny, and end on a compliment, which will warm the leaver's heart. Start with the beginning, or with the teacher's "character" around school. You'll pull it off, I'm sure
     
  5. One of our teachers always writes a poem about the person leaving. It generally contains memories (usually humorous) about the person with a final verse saying how much they will be missed.

     

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