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Would you still work if you didn't have to?

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by Mumler, Apr 11, 2011.

  1. Just putting it out there! I have been teaching 17 years and enjoy most moments and the feeling of making a difference. I feel alive when i am teaching and enjoy seeing the children change and develop. I am very lucky to have the chance to not work (circumstance, not i haven't won the lottery!) but can't decide what to do. I could get all house jobs done in the week and that would free up the weekend for family time. I do worry i would lose my identity and just wither away. How many times can you visit the gym?!! What am i to do?!
     
  2. Just putting it out there! I have been teaching 17 years and enjoy most moments and the feeling of making a difference. I feel alive when i am teaching and enjoy seeing the children change and develop. I am very lucky to have the chance to not work (circumstance, not i haven't won the lottery!) but can't decide what to do. I could get all house jobs done in the week and that would free up the weekend for family time. I do worry i would lose my identity and just wither away. How many times can you visit the gym?!! What am i to do?!
     
  3. fulloffun

    fulloffun New commenter

    could you go part time?
     
  4. Already part time!
     
  5. Personally no, I would be out like a shot. I love the teaching it's all the other bits I'm not keen on. I'd consider part time non classroom teaching, I saw a job recently for a senco that was purely that with no classroom teaching.
     
  6. roise

    roise New commenter

    I always thought that I'd love to be a T.A. if money was no object. You get to work with the children and do intervention programs but clock out completely at the end of the day. Being an EAL or SEN teacher would be more paperwork but also nice. Being a SENCO though seems like not so much fun, it would be all paperwork and dealing with useless outside agencies and explaining why some children don't seem to be making much progress.
     
  7. God! and we have an army of teachers complaining about pupils finding everything so boooring and acting up accordingly, while we silently think "You wait till you find out what work is like!" How can someone be bored whose profession is to know that there is more interesting stuff out there than anyone can ever experience?

    I spent the first dozen years of my career in secondary and tertiary on 3 continents, with all the interest that that provided, but astounded my HoD when I said that if I had half my salary as private income, I wouldn't work, but travel or otherwise occupy myself, eg by learning as many languages as possible. Yes, I enjoyed the interchange with my (old-style) A-level students, but at 53 I had the opportunity of early retirement with a bit of enhancement; the lump sum was more than enough to pay off the mortgage, so I jumped at it. Colleagues worried that I'd be bored (though a couple, with teenagers, said they wished they could afford to) but, apart from anything else, I had more books on my bookshelf, let alone those on my library booklist, than I'd ever have time to read. I was on my own, children grown up and elsewhere, and didn't anticipate regular company. I took (though didn't need) part-time educational jobs where I got paid for what I enjoyed doing any way, inc travelling. I can't imagine ever being bored, and have several relatives coming up to my age who say the same.

    You say I'm lucky? Well of course, but only in the general sense of getting to 70 with reasonable health and a reasonable income. So maybe reading this will give other posters a different take on what faces them as second time school-leavers.
     
  8. I'd carry on working, give up responsibility post and enjoy the actual teaching because I do enjoy the actual teaching. Would probably go part time to give me time to read more and indulge my interests. I suspect, I wouldn't last long in the job if I didn't have to work as I'd become a bit of a loose cannon. Well, more loose than I already am!
     
  9. Mumier you are so very lucky to have the choice, You are fortunate to have the time to visit the gym. I KNOW exactly how you feel simply because you (and I ) have the choice. So much easier if you didn't have the choice, you could say the family couldn't survive without your financial input etc etc. However when you do have the choice it's only you who can decide whether you actually enjoy teaching. And THAT is a big decision.
    Personally, I LOVE teaching. Like you say, you enjoy making the difference. Remember if it's BAD BAD BAD you are in the powerful position of being able to walk away .. not everyone has that privilege. Stick with what you know, what you enjoy, and what gives you pleasure and gives you a a feeling of success .. but do pursue your hobbies, gifts and talents because one day you may need to follow a new path based on something else you are good at. Good Luck and believe in yourself!

    BTW I've been teaching 30+ years!
     
  10. manc

    manc New commenter

    You evidently didn't learn the art of concise writing in that thirty years, in that case.
     

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