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Would you like to live to 120?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by Lascarina, Nov 29, 2015.

  1. Lascarina

    Lascarina Star commenter

    I see in my paper today that there is a real likelihood of a new drug of the Metformin type being available soon that would enable people to live healthily to 120. Would you want to live to 120?
     
  2. nomad

    nomad Star commenter

    Provided I was healthy, mobile and financially self-sufficient, yes.

    The changes I have seen over the past 60+ years, particularly in technological development, have been fascinating and I should love to see what the next 60 years have to offer.

    And there are places on this planet I haven't visited yet - not many, but travel is now easier and many borders have opened up.
     
  3. foxtail3

    foxtail3 Star commenter

    Yes, providing everything was in working order and all other things being equal.

    My dad was an engineer but died when home computers and such technology was in it's infancy. I often think about what he would have made of mobile phones, tablets and all the other stuff that makes up modern life. He was a precision engineer, used to working to thousandths of an inch. I think he would have been fascinated by developments and I would be interested to see future progression.

    I would also like to see how the next couple of generations pan out. It's a privilege to watch them grow and develop.
     
  4. VanEyssen

    VanEyssen Established commenter

    Wow. 50 years plus of retirement.
     
  5. Lascarina

    Lascarina Star commenter

    I suppose, once it became the norm, the retirement age would be raised to 100.
     
  6. RedQuilt

    RedQuilt Star commenter

    The thought of living that long would fill me with dread. I've not been blessed with the easiest journey through the last (almost) 50 years and I'd like to think I won't be subjected to too much more of it.
     
  7. Lascarina

    Lascarina Star commenter

    Me too! And imagine going through 120 Xmases!
     
  8. Didactylos4

    Didactylos4 Star commenter

  9. sabrinakat

    sabrinakat Star commenter

    Having taken Metformin for PCOS (as some studies have shown it can decrease the risk of miscarriage dramatically), NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO! It is the most awful medication with upset stomach and nausea some of its side-effects. Yuck. However, it worked for me and the kitten is now almost 4,

    http://www.webmd.com/infertility-an...20301/diabetes-drug-helps-prevent-miscarriage (there are numerous documented studies since the 2002 news item), just put metformin and miscarriage into google.

    On the living to 120, yes and no - I echo nomad's sentiment, e.g. health and money-wise. Otherwise, no -- to watch those who you love die and the loneliness afterwards, too sad - there is no shared memories, living almost as an outsider.

    How melancholy for a Sunday morning!
     
  10. Lascarina

    Lascarina Star commenter

    But this happens at whatever age the normal lifespan is. Presumably if you were to live till 120 then other people would too.
     
  11. Flere-Imsaho

    Flere-Imsaho Star commenter

    God no.
     
    monicabilongame likes this.
  12. sabrinakat

    sabrinakat Star commenter

    Hopefully, the people I would want to! [I get the point, though - I'm 48 and have more reflective moments now, such as missing my grandparents (my grandmother died 10 years ago, but as I knit and do tapestry, I think about her as she would be delighted that I am continuing the tradition, etc).]
     
  13. Dragonlady30

    Dragonlady30 Star commenter

    Certainly not!! :eek:
     
    Lascarina likes this.
  14. Lascarina

    Lascarina Star commenter

    My grandmother would be 131 now if she were alive. I am currently making a bedspread with multi coloured squares that she taught me how to do when I was about 5 and I think of her often.
     
    sabrinakat likes this.
  15. catmother

    catmother Star commenter

    120? No.
     
  16. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    80 years working... well as long as it was easy to try different jobs, different careers... why not?

    And of course granting health was good.
     
  17. Duke of York

    Duke of York Star commenter

    There would be a high probability that although you might be physically healthy, you'd be suffering from dementia.
     
  18. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    The divorce rate would rocket!
    If it meant good health, mobility and sufficient funds, I'd swallow the pills ... I think.
    I like Lanokia's idea of taking up different careers (I quite fancy training to be a doctor). I'd certainly invest in more rental properties in University towns. I'd set myself targets to learn more languages too.
     
  19. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    The divorce rate would rocket!
    If it meant good health, mobility and sufficient funds, I'd swallow the pills ... I think.
    I like Lanokia's idea of taking up different careers (I quite fancy training to be a doctor). I'd certainly invest in more rental properties in University towns. I'd set myself targets to learn more languages too.
     
  20. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    The divorce rate would rocket!
    If it meant good health, mobility and sufficient funds, I'd swallow the pills ... I think.
    I like Lanokia's idea of taking up different careers (I quite fancy training to be a doctor). I'd certainly invest in more rental properties in University towns. I'd set myself targets to learn more languages too.
     

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