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Would you consider this to be safe practice in a school Nursery

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by lizzy123, Nov 16, 2011.

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    The outdoor area is very long and partly obscured by trees. The
    entrance has no lock and the fence and gate are low enough for a child to climb
    over, or for someone to lift them over. The Nursery garden leads on to a busy through
    road. At present a good half of the area is not used and marked off with a row
    of P.E flat discs. The children 3-4 year olds are expected not to cross
    over them. OFSTED is due imminently and I am concerned that they will consider
    this un safe practice. The class door opens into the outdoor area has no high
    lock so can be opened by the children so anyone can make a run for it. I have
    expressed my concerns to the powers that be to be told this is common practice
    in school. Not in any school I’ve worked in. I also get people wandering in to
    ask where the main reception area is. Your views please.
     
  2. Would be very concerned about this. Suggest you tell Ofsted your concerns - you can do this anonymously by ringing them, they are used to anonymous information.
     
  3. Can you draw up an action plan to develop safeguarding measures that you can discuss with ofsted? Risk assessments for your different areas and the control measures would show you know what's wrong and are doing everything you can to keep children safe. During the inspection ensure that your organisation of staffing makes up for any shortfall in physical barriers.
     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Not safe practice at all. I'm appalled. I'd refuse to teach in such an unsafe situation.Why has it not been addressed?
     
  5. cariad2

    cariad2 New commenter

    It sounds very dangerous. Have you put your concerns in writing to management? If you've only spoken about it, then I'd also put your worries in an email, and print off a copy. When OFSTED inspectors do arrive, then at least management can't put any blame on you. They certainly wouldn't be happy about it, and then something would finally be done to keep children safe.
    I also echo the advice to contace OFSTED anonymously to report this bad practice if management still refuse to act.
    Our security levels were inrceased years ago, after Dunblane. All fences and gates are now very high and locked during the day. They are only open for a short time before and after school. Visitors arriving during the day can only enter the main door if they have been buzzed in by the receptionist. We also have CCTV.
     
  6. My last school was like yours cariad2.It was like fort knox trying to get in or out but I knew no one could escape.
    I have spoken to management and emailed the head and put a copy in my folder.I only have one other adult with me which makes it difficult as well to ensure safety.So we both go outside at the same time which is not ideal.So I am not offering true free flow. I have a child on the spectrum starting in January also.
    I almost feel that by putting the P.E disc markers out each morning that I am drawing attention to the fact I consider it a risk. I do hope OFSTED pick it up but I don't want to be the one to get blamed for it.
     
  7. Apparently its never been a problem and high fences are an eyesore!
     
  8. sadika

    sadika New commenter

    They need a rapid wake-up call! Our school had a safe-guarding appraisal by an Ofsted trained inspector at the beginning of term - NOT meeting equirements and we have nothing like your scenario. Now we have addressed it all and we are like Fort Knox!! High fences, padlocks, lock on the kitchen ... no it doesn't look "nice" and it's a real hassle having to un-do padlocks everywhere ...
     
  9. marymoocow

    marymoocow Star commenter

    Speak to your H&S governor and or LA H&S person. They can do spot inspections, without letting school know who informed them.
     
  10. CONTACT OFSTED!!!!!!!!!
    <h1>Whistleblower hotline</h1>There may be times when council employees and those working with young children will want to report to us concerns about practices and procedures for the safeguarding of children and young people.
    You can contact our hotline in three ways.
    • Call us on 0300 123 3155 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 0300 123 3155 end_of_the_skype_highlighting (Monday to Friday from 8.00am to 6.00pm).
    • Email us at whistleblowing@ofsted.gov.uk.
    • Write to us at:
      WBHL
      Ofsted
      Piccadilly Gate
      Store Street
      Manchester M1 2WD
    <h2>Before you contact our hotline</h2>We suggest that you first read your employer&rsquo;s whistleblowing policy and then raise your concerns with your employer.
    If your employer does not have a whistleblowing policy or if you are still not sure how to raise your concerns with your employer or someone else, we suggest you first get free, confidential advice from the independent whistleblowing charity Public Concern at Work; it can help you to decide whether and/or how to raise your concern. You can call on 020 7404 6609 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting 020 7404 6609 end_of_the_skype_highlighting or email helpline@pcaw.co.uk. For further information, go to the Public Concern at Work website &ndash; it includes guidance on whistleblowing legislation.
    If you are someone who wishes to complain about a service you use that we inspect or regulate, we will deal with your concerns through our normal complaints procedure. For further information, go to the How to complain page.

    Taken from http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/contact-us/whistleblower-hotline
    What they are doing is not safe. If you don't feel able to do this yourself (although it is COMPLETELY confidential), then p.r.o.d one of the parents in the right direction...
     
  11. This Nursery has been like this for the past 10 years and I am the first apparently to raise concerns.I have only been there since September. I am torn to know what to do.I am even beginning to question my judgement! I do know I wouldn't want my children there.




     

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