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Working in a special school..

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by psalm23, Dec 10, 2011.

  1. ..just wondering how I can prepare myself to work in a special school. I've made several visits to a few schools as part of the NASC course. I have experience of being a SENCO 12 years ago and currently now. Would like to possibly look for an opportunity to work in a special school in about 5 years time, anything else I could do? Would completing a Masters help? Thanks for any advice.
     
  2. ..just wondering how I can prepare myself to work in a special school. I've made several visits to a few schools as part of the NASC course. I have experience of being a SENCO 12 years ago and currently now. Would like to possibly look for an opportunity to work in a special school in about 5 years time, anything else I could do? Would completing a Masters help? Thanks for any advice.
     
  3. jlishman2158

    jlishman2158 New commenter

    I have taught for nearly 30 years in mainstream schools with 15 as SENCo.
    I have seen a job in a local SEBD school and would very much like to apply but not sure if I will be even considered for interview. I am going to visit the school and will be quizzing the Deputy Head about exactly what they are looking for and if I even have a chance. I will let you know what is said about my experience.
     
  4. Loony tunes

    Loony tunes New commenter

    I started working in a special needs unit in a mainstream school as a supply teacher which led to a contract and then moved to a special school after a couple of years. The appointments at my school since I've been there have either been NQTs or mainstream teachers, not all of whom had much previous SEN experience. In my school its more about the person than necessarily their experience.
     
  5. dzil

    dzil Occasional commenter

    <font size="2">I've been in special more years than I can remember and have the same experience as Loony. Most special schools expect to train staff on the job. There is very little suitable external training anyway. Most is geared towards mainstream SEN. The difference is considerable.</font>
     
  6. Thank you for your replies, look forward to hearing about your visit. I too have extensive experience in mainstream, have missed the boat really with regards to further promotion but like to think I could be doing something very different in a few years time.
     
  7. i worked in a SEBD school for over 2 year and as an unqualified teacher for 18 months, teaching around 4 subject i have no prior knowledge in, its not always about what you know but what kind of teacher you are, you have to have a good seances of humour and not let anything get to you, the kids are great most of the time but when they are nasty they are real nasty pasties!! :D just go with a positive attitude and shin shin shinnnnnnn!! lol :p
     
  8. Ruthie66

    Ruthie66 New commenter

    is there anybody there? knock once for yes and twice for no.
     
  9. san38

    san38 New commenter

    I am very interested in working in special schools but haven't yet secured an interview in one. I've been in mainstream 12 years but as a late entrant tomainstream teaching I'm now in late 40s. I wonder if my age and being top of the pay scale means that schools are put off me before they even meet me. :(
     
  10. You wont know till you try! If you can possibly volunteer in some way that will help.
     
  11. I moved from mainstream (after 10 years of teaching there) as an AST to a special school SLD/PMLD 18 months ago. I had to take a pay cut, back to UPS1 (now on UPS2) but that was my choice.
    It really is about getting the right person for the job, as opposed to the experience that you've had. I was lucky, as an AST I'd already developed links with the school and was asked to apply when the job became available.
    It's not an easy ride. Although I don't have physically challenging behaviour all the time, I DO have to manage it, and have been trained accordingly. There's changing to do. There's manual handling. It's exhausting in a way that mainstream never was.
    For people considering this, especially as a late career move, ask as part of your performance management/professional development if you can spend some time in your local special school. Not just an hour looking round - a couple of days. If you're worried about not having experience, many charities have social clubs for kids and adults (Mencap, Scope, Down's Syndrome Association, NAS) that are always looking for volunteers.
     
  12. Hi, I am a teacher in a special school, having worked as a TA before qualifying as a teacher. You could try doing a swap with a colleague in special as a secondment. What area of the country are you in? I am in the East Midlands and we had visits from colleagues in mainstream from time to time. I like your user name by the way.
     
  13. Knock Knock?
     
  14. If you are concerned about your 'high level of pay' at a main stream school From my experience of working in a special school I don't think that this would stop a special school employing you. The funding for special schools is totally different than main steam schools so this shouldn't be an issue.
     
  15. Reading your comment and some of the previous ones has been very enlightening. I have been looking for a job as a TA and a SEN teacher and I have not been called for a interview in any of the schools that I have applied. Now I know that there is more needed than just the qualifications. I have SEN training and experience of working with children with SEN in Kenya but it seems not to be relevant here in the UK. Just completed a higher degree in disability studies, specifically deaf education but it seems not to be of any use. What would be your advice?
     
  16. R13

    R13 New commenter

    Funding is an issue in all schools . . . and employing someone on the top of the scale to do a job which they might be very interested in but have minimal experience of might not be considered best value!!
     

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