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Working in a brand new school

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by katherinium, Nov 29, 2011.

  1. There are a couple of jobs going at the moment in schools not yet open... what are the advantages and disadvantages of this do you think? At least when I got there it would be nice and clean. I found an ancient half-drunk milk carton in one of my classrooms when tidying before the start of term a couple of years ago, and picking it up seemed to release the vapours. I would like that to never happen to me again.
     
  2. There are a couple of jobs going at the moment in schools not yet open... what are the advantages and disadvantages of this do you think? At least when I got there it would be nice and clean. I found an ancient half-drunk milk carton in one of my classrooms when tidying before the start of term a couple of years ago, and picking it up seemed to release the vapours. I would like that to never happen to me again.
     
  3. MisterMaker

    MisterMaker Occasional commenter

    Be prepared for a huge amount of work: for a new school policies and schemes of work need creating, orders need making and there will inevitably be construction issues.
    I've been involved in several new schools. Hell of a lot of work, but very rewarding.
     
  4. Ask some searching questions about resources.
    In my one and only experience of teaching in a brand-new school, there weren't any. None. Not even cupboards in the classroom or so much as a metre ruler for the brand-new whiteboard.
    Try teaching science without textbooks or equipment, ditto for maths. No books in the library, etc.
    The idea was apparently to build up resources over time. All very well and good for the people there now......
     
  5. Mainwaring

    Mainwaring Established commenter

    Wot she said. But bear in mind that you may not receive a truthful answer. Multiply that by a million or so if the promoters of your new school are not education professionals.
    Our second school in India eventually got there in terms of resources but not until the owners' thirst for bling had been thoroughly satisfied: such educational essentials as a golf course, a string of thoroughbred horses and a fleet of electric golf carts to whisk the prospective parents around the admittedly gorgeous campus. The lawns were pure Royal Birkdale and from the outside the library looked like the Bod or something out of Hogwarts but there weren't any books in it. When the outdoor play equipment for the infants finally arrived it was installed next to the main gate (i.e. half a mile away from the Infant School) where it could impress the visitors.
     
  6. SMT dude

    SMT dude New commenter

    Arriving here, I found an ancient half-drunk <u>teacher</u> in one of my classrooms.
    Only slightly less malodorous than a deceased milk carton, and one hell of a lot more difficult to get rid of.
    If you have an experienced modern, tireless recruiting whizz to find your brand new staff, the kind of person who can design an application form in ten seconds, who can cull a batch of 100 CVs in ten minutes and can smell UK Best Practice at a range of ten miles, then a startup school would be a dream - for ten years or so....
     
  7. Be careful. I taught at a brand new school in China, I was promised the world and ended up with nothing. Still I moved on and did become a better teacher for it, but when they take away the printer because the teachers are "using it too much" to make resources because you have nothing and are trying to teach you sometimes wonder why you are doing this!
     
  8. moscowbore

    moscowbore Occasional commenter

    If you are new to international schools and the IGCSE or IB, taking a HOD job in a new school is hard work. Setting up a scheme of work, or three, for courses you havent taught before is beldy hard work. In fee-paying schools you will get zero slack from management. Bad results in an establishment where parents are paying for an outcome will not be tolerated despite your rantings about new courses, no training, no resources, doing schemes from scratch etc...... I would not do it again.
     

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