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Working for an L.A and no mention of AWR yet

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by fivepartharmony, Jan 19, 2012.

  1. fivepartharmony

    fivepartharmony New commenter

    I have been working for the same LA for ten years on as a 'sessional tutor' in a Learning Centre. I have no paid holidays or sick leave but do have to be performanced managed, attend meetings( multi agency and CAF's) and complete assessments and reports.I have been waiting to hear that I will be entitled to better conditions but have not thus far.Anyone else in a similar situation?
     
  2. fivepartharmony

    fivepartharmony New commenter

    I have been working for the same LA for ten years on as a 'sessional tutor' in a Learning Centre. I have no paid holidays or sick leave but do have to be performanced managed, attend meetings( multi agency and CAF's) and complete assessments and reports.I have been waiting to hear that I will be entitled to better conditions but have not thus far.Anyone else in a similar situation?
     
  3. Why the concern about the AWR? when we have some excellent commentary from below:
    "...There has been much scaremongering about AWRs -just read the title to this particular forum!

    IF
    supply teacher agencies want to behave and act in even
    more
    exploitative and malign ways by perversely
    interpreting/sacking/dismissing employees [supply teachers] so as to
    prevent them from benefitting from the terms and conditions e.g. sick
    pay, holiday pay. pay parity etc of their permanent/temporary contracted
    teacher work colleagues THEN BRING IT ON!!!!!!!

    Existing UK laws include: the EMPLOYMENT ACT (2010) and the EQUALITY ACT (2010) and even the EU Human Rights can be evoked!
    Any
    agency employee who suspects that the AGENCY is acting
    improperly/unfairly and not within the spirit of the the EU AWRs can
    claim unfair dismissal/unfair treatment and make a claim for this via
    the local INDUSTRIAL TRIBUNAL.
    Hence if the employee has shown
    work commitment, reliablity, punctuality, excellent work performance
    then the agency will have to come out with some good reasons as to why
    around that employee was dismissed/deregistered at around 11-12 weeks
    sterling work performance?????
    Is the exploitative agency going
    to say to the presiding judge, " Me, Lord I did not want the worker to
    benefit from better terms and conditions despite his/her work
    performance so we sacked him/her!"???????
    So agencies out there
    bring it on and we will hit you with successful industrial tribunal
    cases who will most certainly rule in the worker's favour!!!!!
    Just think of David Cameron's latest announcement on developing a "fair and worthwhile economy!

    The nail is NOT IN THE COFFIN YET but we will all witness a bonfire
    of malign, greedy, exploitative supply teacher agencies who will all be
    SHUT DOWN!!!!! Just wait...!
     
  4. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    AWR is about temporary employees getting the usual rate that the hirer pays their contract staff after being supplied to work for them for more than 12 weeks. In other words, the employment age3ncy supplying them can make more profit from the worker for 12 weeks only and the worker than gets parity of pay with their permanent colleagues (but not access to things like occupational pension schemes , sick pay etc).
    It won't apply to you as you are already being paid directly by the hirer, not by a private agency.
    Your sessional rate should already include a pro-rata amount to cover their duty to pay holiday pay.
     
  5. fivepartharmony

    fivepartharmony New commenter

    Thanks Jubilee, I am pretty sure that my pay does not include a pro-rata amount to cover holiday pay. How would I work it out? I do worry about my lack of entitlement to sick pay. Some have my colleagues who have worked for the sevice for 20 years plus have had to take time off for serious illness and have not received anything.If that happened to me, I would be in serious financial trouble very quickly.I do realise that supply teachers are in the same position, I just think that the role I am in, is not different to a teacher in, say a special school and that we should have a proper contract.
     
  6. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    You are in the same position as supply teachers in that no sick pay is on offer and you'd just have to rely on the statutory sick pay offered by the Benefits Agency if unable to work.
    You can work out whether you are getting any holiday pay by finding out what a contracted employee on your pay spine earns per hour/day/week etc.
    On Mainscale teacher pay, the annual salary is paid for a full-timer attending work for 1265 hours over 195 days. Their pay is then paid in 12 equal monthly instalments so that they are employees 52 weeks per year.
    We supply taechers, paid by an LA, get annual salary divided by 195 for each day worked. that includes pro-rata holiday pay. If we were lucky enough to get work on all 195 days that schools are open, we'd earn the same annual salary as a contracted worker, but still have fewer employment rights.
    You need to work out how many sessions make up a full-time, permanent employees' contract. Scale up your pay if you were booked for that many sessions. does it reach that of a permanent employee on the same pay grade? If so, you are getting pro-rata holiday pay.
    Even TAs and other support staff in schools get the legal minimum of 4 weeks' holiday pay built into their pay.
     

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