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Work related stress and time off:(

Discussion in 'Health and wellbeing' started by NQT1984, Jan 3, 2010.

  1. I am going to the doctors tomorrow morning as I cannot face going into work. I have been under much stress with issues at work (NQT) and may be getting an early release. I can't say to much on here obviously, however I have cried most of the holidays, hair is falling out and I have lost my appetite completly, not to mention constant headaches.
    I have never been sick before. When I go to the doctors do I just discuss how I have been feeling and symptons ect? How long to GP's normally give sick notes for? Do we forward them to school?
    I am very stressed out at the moment:eek:(

     
  2. I am going to the doctors tomorrow morning as I cannot face going into work. I have been under much stress with issues at work (NQT) and may be getting an early release. I can't say to much on here obviously, however I have cried most of the holidays, hair is falling out and I have lost my appetite completly, not to mention constant headaches.
    I have never been sick before. When I go to the doctors do I just discuss how I have been feeling and symptons ect? How long to GP's normally give sick notes for? Do we forward them to school?
    I am very stressed out at the moment:eek:(

     
  3. fantastischfish

    fantastischfish Established commenter

    Hmmmph, my first response to this thread has disappeared.
    I just wanted to say that, although I've never gone through actual diagnosed stress, I can totally sympathise with how you must be feeling: this is a really difficult job, and anyone who lands in a school with supportive colleagues and management is onto a winner; unfortunately, I come across so few teacher (especially younger ones) who feel completely supported. The workload and paperwork are just appalling.
    One piece of advice could be to write down what you would like to tell your GP before you go. This way you are less likely to forget something important and if you are feeling, as you probably will be, a little tearful, then you can just read what you've written. Sometimes telling someone what is troubling you is the most difficult part - you 'cheat sheet' may help you feel more comfortable.
    I think you are doing the right thing by going to your doctor. Good luck, I'm sure he/she will be very understanding and helpful. I hope you feel better soon.
     
  4. phlogiston

    phlogiston Star commenter

    Print 2 copies, one for you, one for the doc.
    I think that all of the professional associations have a support hotline, where you can ring up and get support from someone with training, who will know all the ins and outs off stress and teaching.
    P
     
  5. phatsals

    phatsals Occasional commenter

    Sorry to read you are feeling so unwell. I have been in that situation and so offer the following in that light.
    Go to the Drs and tell them how you are feeling - they will know by looking at you how unwell you are. It is usual to get 2 to 4 weeks initially, if you are still unwell the following notes are likely to be for a month or 6 weeks at a time. Fill in your details, photocopy them if you can and post to school. Ask that the GP puts Work Related Stress as reason for absence.
    Contact your union if you haven't already and get them on board, that way there is also some extra support for you should you need it.
    Take your time to get well and don't make any important decisions about your life right now. This includes decisions about resignation. In a couple of months when things are clearer make decisions then, but right now your thinking is likely to be confused.
    Give yourself the time you need to recover, treat yourself well and remember the special person that you are. No-one deserves to feel that bad about a job,

     
  6. Hi,
    I just wanted to let you know that you are not alone. I've been teaching for 10 years and following a change of school, year group and a promotion I have found myself in the position of being of (10 weeks so far) with stress related illnesses.
    I feels like the end of the world and you'll have quite a few weeks of feeling like you are hopeless, that you are alone etc. But, really you are not! I have been surprised to find the amount of teachers on this site that are unsupported, drowning in paperwork and losing all sense of what it is like to have a 'normal' life where guilt of not working 90% of your waking hours is featured.
    I went to the doctor and he signed me off for 2 weeks initially, then 4 week blocks with sick note (I sent mine in).
    I was given Citalopram to calm the anxiety, not so nice at first but they have calmed me down enough to get some sleep (everything feels so much better after a good nights sleep!
    This website really helped me in the first few weeks, there are so many supportive people here that have experience the same problem and will offer advice.
    The best thing that I have heard is 'remember that it is just a job!'
    x x
     
  7. PS I wrote all of my symptoms down and read them to the doctor. This helped me so much, that is fantastic advice. Stress can really affect your memory and concentration.
     
  8. Thank you for this:)

    It really does make a difference knowing that there are other people in the same situation. MY GP didnt ask me about any symptoms.Maybe the stress is not easy to hide. The GP said i should take as much time off as i need.:eek:)
     
  9. fantastischfish

    fantastischfish Established commenter

    Well done for going to the GP. Use your time off well: relax, read books, put your feet up, take some exercise and concentrate on YOU.
    You must not do ANY school work whilst you are off, and if anyone tried to guilt-trip you into doing any planned etc, explain that you have been advised not to do any work and seek union support.
    Feel better soon
    Eva x xx
     
  10. Hi
    I too am finding that work has got too much (again!) and am on Citalopram for anxiety. It really feels awful at first - a very good way of losing weight though - and can make you feel even more anxious and stressed. Hopefully after a while I will start to feel better and start to rebuild my life again.
    If you have been prescribed Fluoxetine(prozac) be aware that you might feel really down at first - last time I was depressed, I was almost suicidal, so take good care and make sure friends/family are aware so they can support you in the first weeks - eventually it does help - but combined with cognitive behaviour therapy its better.
    By law employers have a duty of care towards you (and this includes mental wellbeing) - its a shame the focus is always on the school's overall performance, and the children - what about the teachers?
    Look after yourself as the effects of stress can cause both mental and physical health problems
    make sure you eat, have exercise and get support - the teacher support network is great!- unions are also good at helping make sure that schools meet theirlegal obligations under the health and safety at work act - check out the HSE website for management standards for stress at work
    All the best
    Charkeythecat

     
  11. PS as a NQT you might still be quite young - your 20s are a time when severe mental illnesses triggered by stress can happen (not common, but it is a possibility)
    so take care of yourself , and remember that schools that overly pressurise teachers are unhealthyplaces! Life is for living! - not just about hanging on!
    again, all the best
    Charkeythecat
     

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