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WJEC AS English Language - spoken language coursework

Discussion in 'English' started by sasha79, Feb 1, 2011.

  1. I have been given the onerous task of teaching AS Level Language for the first time this year. I have really enjoyed the analysis of written texts but I cannot quite get to grips with the spoken language analysis coursework. Students have to produce their own transcripts from language in the media (chat shows etc.) I have never in my academic life studied spoken language apart from language acquisition. Therefore, I actually cannot give valuable advice to students about whether their transcripts are worthy of analysis. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. I have been given the onerous task of teaching AS Level Language for the first time this year. I have really enjoyed the analysis of written texts but I cannot quite get to grips with the spoken language analysis coursework. Students have to produce their own transcripts from language in the media (chat shows etc.) I have never in my academic life studied spoken language apart from language acquisition. Therefore, I actually cannot give valuable advice to students about whether their transcripts are worthy of analysis. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.
     
  3. montyjacs

    montyjacs New commenter

    Hi sasha
    I used transcripts off any exam board's site and sample answers to teach the class the basics of conversation analysis and the basics of conversation theory. If you haven'tgot a copy of Alan Gardiner's Revision Guide, this would help you and your students to get your head round the basics. REally any transcript is fine as they are just seeking to comment on the features contained.
    best wishes

     
  4. What montyjacs said, but if you're doing this long term, it's probably worth mugging up on some other areas too. The best and most accessible books I've found for teachers have been Peter Grundy's Doing Pragmatics (loads of good egs of transcripts in there), Deborah Cameron's Working With Spoken Discourse, and this one by Ron Norman, which is also really good for teaching spoken language in lit texts.
    "Onerous task"? Surely, it's an honour...
     
  5. ...and I've just noticed that English edu is printing a guide to conversation analysis by Beth Kemp (who wrote the AQA A Language and Mode material for the Nelson Thornes textbook). That could have everything you need in it.
     

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