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Will the King's speech help people understand the impact of stammering?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by robyn147, Jan 12, 2011.

  1. I haven't seen the film but know all about stammering having had one for many
    years. It was awful in class and I went to a "good" Grammar school.
    Being really quiet in class, not being able to engage in real
    conversation and discussion, struggling on certain words (Why does your
    name give you problems?), having to alter what you are going to say,
    knowing you are intelligent but not able to say what you want to say and
    teachers not really accommodating your needs.
    I remember a
    teacher getting me to do a really difficult role when we were doing a
    class reading. I hated that. Having to do the morning reading (yes -
    that kind of school) to a hall of 1000 pupils because everyone did. In
    my case, I do believe it reflected deep down psychological issues - my
    stammering has stopped recently as my general confidence and self esteem
    has grown.
    So I hope the film does allow people to see stammering for what it is and not as a comedy issues as in Open all hours.
     
  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    I haven't seen the film but know all about stammering having had one for many
    years. It was awful in class and I went to a "good" Grammar school.
    Being really quiet in class, not being able to engage in real
    conversation and discussion, struggling on certain words (Why does your
    name give you problems?), having to alter what you are going to say,
    knowing you are intelligent but not able to say what you want to say and
    teachers not really accommodating your needs.
    I remember a
    teacher getting me to do a really difficult role when we were doing a
    class reading. I hated that. Having to do the morning reading (yes -
    that kind of school) to a hall of 1000 pupils because everyone did. In
    my case, I do believe it reflected deep down psychological issues - my
    stammering has stopped recently as my general confidence and self esteem
    has grown.
    So I hope the film does allow people to see stammering for what it is and not as a comedy issues as in Open all hours.
     
  3. I cringed at OAH even when it was on.
    If you know what was behind G6's stammer, how could you fail to feel for him? It was a good film but his reasons for stammering aren't everyone's, and you can expect a flurry of well-meaning pats on the arm as they all try and be your Lionel and understand.
     
  4. It occurred to me after the film that one rarely comes across a child who stammers (in secondary) these dyas. Early intervention.
     
  5. There was a story on the news last night about a young boy with a stammer, his mother had stammered very badly as a child, the boy was only three and was having intensive speech therapy and overcoming his stammer. So early intervention may be why we do not come across so many children who stammer now days.
    Third thread on The King's Speech so it is raising awareness and having great recommendations - don't miss it!
     

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