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Will the coronavirus pandemic reshape mobility and transportation? | DW News

Discussion in 'Geography' started by AndrewvanZyl, May 22, 2020.

  1. AndrewvanZyl

    AndrewvanZyl Occasional commenter



    The coronavirus is changing how we travel. Public transport is a 'no go' for many. They're afraid of catching the virus. Some are turning to motorbikes and bicycles. A lot of cities are taking steps: European and American capitals are rolling out thousands of kilometers of bike ways, to push for more cycling as part of a greener future. Some are aslo offering free bikesharing. Global centers are automating crossing signals. You now don't need a ticket in dozens of cities during the crisis. The crisis is changing mobility for good. But for better or worse? Critics say clearing lanes will create bigger traffic jams and thus cause more pollution and noise. Or could more people ditch cars altogether?
     
    robertgait95 likes this.
  2. robertgait95

    robertgait95 New commenter

    I for one welcome the aspect of more bikes and the transition to a greener method of travel. The funding that the UK government is prepared to spend on this initiative is a huge lifeline to the transport department. This in mind I can see a few set backs, notably that concerning cyclist safety and cyclist abuse. As a cyclist I am often "in the way" of drivers just because I am on the same road squeezed as far as possible to the left hand side, or cycling on the designated cycling path, which some drivers love to use in order to overtake slower vehicles. Numerous times I have had vehicles pull out on me or turn in to a junction, where if I had been a car, they would have duly waited for my passing. Additionally, regulations for helmets and earphones would be beneficial to upholding cyclist safety, a helmet needs no explanation; but earphones are a distraction from nearby vehicles and other cyclists who share the road/ cycle lane, especially if the bike isn't equipped with mirrors. I have lived in York, Cambridge and currently, Lincoln; cities that have transport schemes in the hope of reducing traffic congestion; it would be nice to see the scheme increase their cycling facilities e.g more bikes to rent/ more bike stands; and tackle the aforementioned measures necessary to support the greener option. Once safety and attitudes have aligned I think we will see more people favouring bikes for short distance journeys; especially when the weather is good, which in turn frees up the buses for those that are less able to cycle.
     

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