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Will it be such a bad thing if the government/TDA cut teacher training posts?

Discussion in 'Thinking of teaching' started by stacey1004, Jan 26, 2011.

  1. The reason I ask this very pertinent and controversial question is that if you look at the statistics around 48% of trained teacher do not find employment in education!
    I've always known that it was a competetive field, but now I've looked into it I find those statistics pretty scary! There's no way that I will allow it to put me off as I know that teaching is the right thing for me and I am willing to wait for that job to come along, but I was thinking will it be such a bad thing if some of the training places are cut?
    Having worked within a school that has teacher trainees regularly I have seen at least 60 trainees across all subjects in the past 6 years, some of which haven't finished their PGCE course for whatever reason, some of which have got onto a PGCE "because I didn't know what to do with my degree", some that have realised teaching is not for them but have carried on to at least get the qualification they have worked for even though it's highly unlikely they will enter teaching, and those that love it, make great teachers and find it easy to get a job!
    So my point is; if funding is cut then Unis will have to get even more choosy, some people may interview very well and be totally excellent on paper, but put them in front of a class and they are completely ineffective even after weeks of 'classroom management' training sat in a lecture theatre. Personally I think there is nothing that prepares you for working in the school environment like working in the school environment, either as a TA or Cover Supervisor or something similar, so maybe people should 'trial' it first before they jump in, I think working in a school for a year would either make people more determined or make them realise it's not right for them, a 2 week placement is such a small view of how it really is, yet that is all that is expected by some Unis.
    Someone in my family is guilty of training as a teacher because they weren't sure what else to do with their degree, and it frustrates me that the place could have gone to someone who was passionate about teaching. Ironically the job they are now training for they could have left school at 18 and walked into.......but hey ho you make decisions in life that are right, and some that are wrong and it takes life experience to learn what you really want.
    Sorry, I'm now rambling because it's late but I just wondered how other people felt!!


     
  2. The reason I ask this very pertinent and controversial question is that if you look at the statistics around 48% of trained teacher do not find employment in education!
    I've always known that it was a competetive field, but now I've looked into it I find those statistics pretty scary! There's no way that I will allow it to put me off as I know that teaching is the right thing for me and I am willing to wait for that job to come along, but I was thinking will it be such a bad thing if some of the training places are cut?
    Having worked within a school that has teacher trainees regularly I have seen at least 60 trainees across all subjects in the past 6 years, some of which haven't finished their PGCE course for whatever reason, some of which have got onto a PGCE "because I didn't know what to do with my degree", some that have realised teaching is not for them but have carried on to at least get the qualification they have worked for even though it's highly unlikely they will enter teaching, and those that love it, make great teachers and find it easy to get a job!
    So my point is; if funding is cut then Unis will have to get even more choosy, some people may interview very well and be totally excellent on paper, but put them in front of a class and they are completely ineffective even after weeks of 'classroom management' training sat in a lecture theatre. Personally I think there is nothing that prepares you for working in the school environment like working in the school environment, either as a TA or Cover Supervisor or something similar, so maybe people should 'trial' it first before they jump in, I think working in a school for a year would either make people more determined or make them realise it's not right for them, a 2 week placement is such a small view of how it really is, yet that is all that is expected by some Unis.
    Someone in my family is guilty of training as a teacher because they weren't sure what else to do with their degree, and it frustrates me that the place could have gone to someone who was passionate about teaching. Ironically the job they are now training for they could have left school at 18 and walked into.......but hey ho you make decisions in life that are right, and some that are wrong and it takes life experience to learn what you really want.
    Sorry, I'm now rambling because it's late but I just wondered how other people felt!!


     
  3. Slippersandagoodbook

    Slippersandagoodbook New commenter

    I would imagine that it would be viewed as a 'bad thing' for all those teaching and non-teaching staff at ITT providers that would lose their job as a result of the cuts.
    Personally, I agree that a two week placement/observation only gives a small snapshot of what it is like working in a school. However, a one year 'placement' may not be financially viable for most, even though it would give a clearer picture of what working in a school actually involves. There is no perfect answer!
     
  4. I did a PGCE because I couldn't think what else to do. That was the last time we had a Tory government intent on using unemployment as a policy tool to hold down wages in 1981. Well I'm still teaching, after 30 years, and have been Head of Dept in two schools, Head of 6th Form and now work in an ITE provider leading a PGCE course. Jobs? 90% plus of my graduates walk straight into them.
     
  5. That's really reassuring Bobdog, you're obviously a top class provider.
    If there are big cuts then it's unlikely that the top quality providers will feel the pinch, will the TDA look at things like employment after training figures/drop out rates/OFSTED reports etc to make their choices I wonder? I just don't know how they're going to make the decisions.
    I know there are plenty of people who got into teaching that weren't totally sure and make excellent teachers, but I also find it sad that so many places go to people with that attitude. Some, like you, go on to do great things, others don't bother finishing the course or never get a teaching position which means they had a place that could have gone to someone who really wanted it.
    It's so unsettling knowing that I really want this, have spent the last 6 years getting to this point and now I have the uncertainty of waiting....and waiting...and waiting...there is nothing I want more than to teach, I hope they announce the figures soon!
     
  6. I have been working in a secondary school since April as a teaching assistant/cover super/form tutor and would not have even got an interview for my course let alone a place if I had't had this experience as it was vital to the entry requirements. I have took a 50% pay cut to do this and work in a school that take many Teach First intakes who have become dear friends of mine but have voiced they are in two minds in staying in teaching as aprofession once their two years is up!
    I really want to become a teacher,have got onto a course that takes only 13 people and now it might be cut totally. It just is so frustrating!
     
  7. Hi Bobdog,
    Is that 90% getting a full time teaching position in a school or does that include supply and other jobs?
     
  8. Full time, permanent, teaching jobs. Actually TDA data is strewn with errors. I keep my own records and know where my students have gone (I'm still in touch with 80%= of those I've taught over the past 7 years). I don't know how TDA manage to mangle the data, but they do!
     
  9. There is some frightening statistics out there. The TES NQT supplement made it look as if only 20% of last years new teachers were in full time employment.
    Am I right in thinking that part of the decision about the number of places is one made every year to regulate the number of NQT's entering the market?
     
  10. Stats are all well and good. I call their 48% as being excessive. In my experience, there are MANY maternity leave contracts and 1 year NQT contracts and I'd say a significant amount of the 48% are back with the 52% after their year of lovely work. I've seen a lot of talented staff bafflingly be "let go" after a year contract. It is utterly mad. The movers and shakers are utterly unaware of the staffing situation and chatting to your college tutors, school placement people, etc, etc will give you an unrealistic picture of reality...... It is up to you what you do, but I'd save my energy-to-play-the-game for the next economic boom.
     
  11. To be honest I think that the number of places should be cut! Controversial this may be but I speak as an NQT who can't get a job because I am competing with 200+ applicants per job. I know there are thousands of other people in the same position as me. There are obviously a surplus of teachers and a lack of jobs so more work should be put into helping unemployed teachers get work in teaching rather than training up hundreds/thousands more.
    Even supply is dead at the moment. It is really tough out here at the moment. Oh and regarding your other point, I came into teaching by accident but thoroughly enjoy it and I am just as commited as those who have always wanted to teach. Would it be right to have denied me a training place? I think not.
     

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