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Why why why?

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by Doodlem, Sep 15, 2011.

  1. Hi.
    I have a little boy in my reception class who constantly asks why?
    I know children at this age are meant to be inquisitive and I encourage the children to ask questions and explore but this is so excessive it's got me a little worried.

    Being asked 10 times a day why we have to sit on the carpet is starting to get a little trying...
    But it is also affecting his interactions with other children (why is the dinosaurs there? Why is your car green? Etc)

    He is an only child, but has been at the same pre-school as all the other children in the class for the 18 mo this prior to starting school.

    I have started making a log of any particularly odd lines of questioning or instances so I have dated evidence.
    For example, yesterday we looked at daily routines using flashcards and he completely refused to put bath time in the order because he doesn't have a bath everyday. All the other children accepted that bath time came before bed time but he wouldnt even have the card near the rest of his.

    Does any one have any advice on anything I should do or put in place to support him... If anything for the social aspects (the other children are quickly becoming fed up of constantly being questioned) or my own sanity

    Thanks
     
  2. Hi.
    I have a little boy in my reception class who constantly asks why?
    I know children at this age are meant to be inquisitive and I encourage the children to ask questions and explore but this is so excessive it's got me a little worried.

    Being asked 10 times a day why we have to sit on the carpet is starting to get a little trying...
    But it is also affecting his interactions with other children (why is the dinosaurs there? Why is your car green? Etc)

    He is an only child, but has been at the same pre-school as all the other children in the class for the 18 mo this prior to starting school.

    I have started making a log of any particularly odd lines of questioning or instances so I have dated evidence.
    For example, yesterday we looked at daily routines using flashcards and he completely refused to put bath time in the order because he doesn't have a bath everyday. All the other children accepted that bath time came before bed time but he wouldnt even have the card near the rest of his.

    Does any one have any advice on anything I should do or put in place to support him... If anything for the social aspects (the other children are quickly becoming fed up of constantly being questioned) or my own sanity

    Thanks
     
  3. NellyFUF

    NellyFUF Lead commenter

    I always tell parents that when children ask "Why?" they are wanting more information, more input, keep talking to me please.
    If he does not have a bath everyday then of course he will not agree to put it into your ordering system.
    He is your provocation.

     

  4. We based the routines on a little boys day in a story - I rephrased it for him about the story but he still (very strongly) just would not accept how a bath could be part of a routine.


    I accepted it and just took that card out for him but, combined with the constant question, just got me thinking a bit
     
  5. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I'm not sure why you see his questions as a problem/concern to be honest. Inquisitive children are a godsend use his questions.
     
  6. You may need to judge whether it is genuine curiosity or a type of verbal tic. Genuine curiosity is easy and rewarding to deal with, but it could be a behaviour habit which needs modifying. One response could be to ask the child if he can answer the question himself, why does he think....
     
  7. I agree with thumble and ask Why do you think? Can you work out the answer for yourself? Or simply, I wonder why? Can be very trying I agree, I have a lovely little one in my Rec class who constantly calls out Can I get up now? when we are sitting on the carpet, Inow give him a timer to watch, you could also try (depending on his maturity) giving him 5 why? cards and each time he asks why he has to give you a card, when he has run out of why? cards he isn't allowed to ask why? any more!!
     
  8. Mainly because it is affecting how he interacts with the others.
    They want to play dressing up without being asked why they are wearing a helmet, why they are a knight, why they want to build a tower, why the tower is green, why they laughed when it fell down, why they then move to the home corner, why they are cooking toast, why they are making tea, why they are talking on the phone etc etc

    It is that extreme!
    All valid questions but the others think it spoils their games
     
  9. I like the idea of asking him 'why do you think?'
    He is a bright little boy and hopefully that will get him thinking a bit more
     

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