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Why does the independent sector not following the teaching standards?

Discussion in 'Independent' started by atang, Sep 13, 2017.

  1. atang

    atang New commenter

    Hi all

    I worked at an independent school 2 years ago.
    However, before I started this role, I had gone through threshold and was on UPS1.
    Once I started at the independent school, this became null and void.
    At my current place, I am required to prove that I have been through threshold. Though this is a minor irritation, this would have been far easier if independent schools followed the same teaching standards as comprehensive schools. Wouldn't this make sense as then there would be greater consistency in this if we were to go from the public to private state?
     
    install likes this.
  2. sabrinakat

    sabrinakat Star commenter

    With no pay portability in either state or independent schools now, what a previous school paid, UPS/threshold, etc
    is worthless as a comparison, sorry!
     
  3. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    We do follow the same teaching standards as teachers in state schools, not just comprehensive schools.
    We just don't use the same pay scales.

    And for a great many teachers in independent schools, one of the perks is higher pay.
     
  4. install

    install Star commenter

    I have worked in both. Teaching in the state sector is alot tougher - a poor teacher won't last that long :cool:
     
    8sycamore and Lara mfl 05 like this.
  5. Alldone

    Alldone Established commenter

    That's why they are independent schools. I came from industry, and did a 12 month temporary post in my first Indie school. Then I got a job at another Indie school, near the bottom of the pay scale. After 12 months the HT said he noticed I was at the bottom of the pay scale and wanted to accelerate my progress up it. Can't imagine any State schools doing this. Anyway, within a few years I was paid pretty well. Not only that, I was happy just to teach - didn't want to be SLT etc. School used to give me "made up" enhancement points, so by the time I retired my salary was pretty much the same as the HODs I worked for.
     
  6. percy topliss

    percy topliss Occasional commenter

  7. atang

    atang New commenter

    Thank you for your reply.
    I took a small pay cut to teach at the independent school and my TLR was minimal compared to what I am currently on. I realise that it is not about financial gain but I would have hoped there would be more consistency between the sectors.
     
    install likes this.
  8. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    I did the same, but it is nothing at all to do with the teaching standards.
     
    Lara mfl 05 and sabrinakat like this.
  9. the hippo

    the hippo Established commenter Community helper

    Independent schools are independent. If the OP does not like that, then maybe the sensible thing to do would be to teach in a state school instead.

    Teaching in an independent school is not the same as teaching in a state school. Therefore the salaries (and the other benefits) are probably going to be different.

    Yes, I would agree that teaching in some inner-city comprehensives must be incredibly difficult. To be honest, I do not think that I could cope with the pressures and the problems.
     
    Lara mfl 05 and install like this.
  10. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    I wouldn't last a day!
    It's why I choose not to.
     
    Lara mfl 05 likes this.
  11. install

    install Star commenter

    In my 20 plus years of teaching I have seen some great teachers in the state sector ...not sure some in the other sector would last that long. :cool:
     
  12. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    What an appalling post.
    There are excellent teachers and terrible teachers in all sectors of education.

    There are pressures and stresses in all sectors, just different ones in different sectors.

    The key is finding one's own niche and playing to one's own strengths.
     
    Lara mfl 05 likes this.
  13. Alldone

    Alldone Established commenter

    Not sure how to read post #11. Does he mean that independent teachers wont last as long as he did (20 years) - well I did 28 years in the Independent sector. Or does he mean that teachers in the Independent sector wouldn't last long in the State sector. I do know of a few friends who moved into the State sector from my Indie school - they moved primarily to get promotion, and most if not all, have done very well. I have a lot of respect for those teachers who work in difficult Inner City schools because they want to help those disadvantaged children. I wanted to have the easiest teaching career I could get, and that's what I pretty much got.
     
  14. install

    install Star commenter

    Yeah -I mean in my experience overall, teachers in the Indie sector wouldn't last long in the state sector- and some had most likely no desire to anyway. And I have seen quite a few teachers jump to the Private Sector for that reason. They echo that even now - although it is a case of 'horses for courses'. They freely admit they wouldn't survive for a day in the state sector now - and wouldn't want to anyway.

    Of course, there are exceptions - and the same may be true the other way round. I have seen one or two teachers come from Indie to the State - one went back; the other stayed but that move was years ago. Haven't seen any moves into the State over the past ten years though:cool:
     
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2017
  15. install

    install Star commenter

    Says it all. I hear that comment alot from teachers now in Indie who have worked in the State.:cool:
     
  16. install

    install Star commenter

    Mmmmm....experience says otherwise and even in your case you admit you would struggle. Many teachers simply don't want to work or wouldn't survive in State schools. Hence the issues with recruitment. Of course, it may well be the case the other way round too; but lately, just lately, it is getting tougher and tougher in State schools.

    Even some State teachers are struggling on a daily basis..and that is 'appalling' and that is a 'reality' for some..
     
  17. install

    install Star commenter

    Brilliant post - very honest and realistic too :cool:
     
    the hippo likes this.
  18. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    You miss the point.
    There are also a great many state school teachers who wouldn't survive five minutes in an independent and so they choose not to. There are a great many pressures and difficulties, though very different from those in what used to be called 'sink' state schools.

    I didn't say I would struggle in a state school, but in an inner city comprehensive. I spent 20 years in state education and would be fine back there again. However there is a world of difference between the rural primaries where I live, and would work, and inner city secondaries. I started my career in secondary schools and simply prefer primary.

    There is also a world of difference between one independent and another. Some staff in my school wouldn't last five mins in another independent with different priorities. Others would be fine anywhere.
     
  19. install

    install Star commenter

    Thankyou for your reply. Your point and your opinion is made much clearer now.
     
    the hippo likes this.
  20. the hippo

    the hippo Established commenter Community helper

    This old hippopotamus is currently teaching in southern China. Teaching in an international school adds a whole new dimension, as many expats experience homesickness and a feeling of dislocation. We have all had a Bad China Day, when everything goes wrong and it does not make sense. On the other hand, teaching Chinese students is just about as good as it gets, as they are so hard-working, polite and thoroughly charming.

    In some ways teaching in an international school is a bit more like teaching in an independent school in the UK, as most international schools are fee-paying, but really there are not so many similarities. One huge advantage is that my school in Shenzhen gives a generous rent allowance, enough to pay for a two-bedroomed apartment in the centre of the city, but unlike teachers in a lot of independent schools I do not have to do any boarding duties.
     

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