1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Why does Ruth Miskin want split 'a' to be taught before split ' i'?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by noo72, Feb 7, 2012.

  1. I am feeling frustrated that I am being 'told' to teach split digraphs in an order that makes no sense to me.

    Letters and Sounds advocate teaching long vowel grapheme 'ie' first, then the split digraph i-e. In this way, links can be made between the words tie and time, pie and pine and so on, to illustrate how the split digraph works.

    Ruth Miskin suggests teaching split 'a' first. To me this seems to be illogical, as there are no common words with the /ae/ grapheme to help introduce the concept of split digraphs.

    Any thoughts on this?
     
  2. I am feeling frustrated that I am being 'told' to teach split digraphs in an order that makes no sense to me.

    Letters and Sounds advocate teaching long vowel grapheme 'ie' first, then the split digraph i-e. In this way, links can be made between the words tie and time, pie and pine and so on, to illustrate how the split digraph works.

    Ruth Miskin suggests teaching split 'a' first. To me this seems to be illogical, as there are no common words with the /ae/ grapheme to help introduce the concept of split digraphs.

    Any thoughts on this?
     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Letters and Sounds teaches "igh" first [​IMG] then "ie" "i_e" and "y"
    "ai" then "ay" "a_e" "eigh" "ey" and "ei"
    so I'm not quite sure what you mean
     
  4. yes, sorry... I realise that igh is taught first. Then ie, then i-e. My point is that i-e is the best split digraph to teach first, as it leads on naturally from 'ie' (pie links to pine, tie links to time etc). Ruth Miskin teaches a-e then i-e and o-e before 'ie', so valuable links between the 'unsplit' 'ie' and the split 'i' cannot be made/ referred to, as the children do not yet know 'ie' as a long vowel grapheme. Sorry for any confusion in my OP- complicated!
     
  5. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    How many words are there like pie pine, tie time, lie lime, die dice, - that's kind of it isn't it? Is it really necessary to start that way to get the concept of a vowel consonant e giving the long vowel sound? I'm not sure it matters.
     
  6. But mystery, I find it very useful to teach the 'unsplit' 'ie' digraph first, as a way in . Yes, there may only be a limited number of words that follow the pattern you describe above, but one only needs a few examples to introduce the concept in this way. Maybe it's just personal preference, but I like to introduce split digraphs like this, as outlined in Letters and Sounds (I also, of course, explain that the 'e' at the end of the word makes the vowel sound in that word a long vowel sound (eg bit becomes bite).
     
  7. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    I assume you are just embarking on Speed Sounds set 3 in Read Write Inc. Would it make that much difference to your school if you swapped around the order a bit and started with ie and then i -e nice smile? If you think it works well that way, what's the harm?
     

Share This Page