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Why do so many teachers object to going on strike?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by salix, Jun 18, 2011.

  1. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I've worked in the "real world" and have a very generous private sector pension to look forward to (far better than my predicted Teacher's pension) paid less contributions for less number of years ... work was easy, hours were very sociable, holidays were generous oh and pay at the time was better than I got when I first qualified ...
    have either you or Milgod worked in the private sector?
     
  2. The Red Heron

    The Red Heron New commenter

    'so what you're actually saying is that because most other people have crappy pay and ****** T&Cs, we should too and be grateful '
    Christ...its that what you honestly believe??? we have sh.itty pay?? I earn more than most people I know and work less hours-unbelievably stupid comment..
    As for the private sector..I compare my lifestyle and pay/conditions etc with the people around me, friends, family, people in my area of a similar age, not with high flying accountants and bankers from the city
    For gods sake get a grip of yourselves
     
  3. Except for the fact that they do work. Strike action in the 1980s prevented the huge weakening of terms and conditions.
    Yes, our job is to educate children, but governments should not take advantage of those wgho serve the public. It is a huge responsibility - as in many public sector occupations - and remuneration (of which pensions ARE deferred income) should reflect this.
    Let's also deal with the straw man that we have a better pension than a lot of people whilst we're at it. Firstly, this logic leads inexorably towards a race for the bottom. No one can serioiusly feel that this is desirable. Secondly, one needs to consider the potential earning power of teachers in the private sector - many of us qualified to postgraduate level. You need to compare like with like. (By way of anecdotal experience, many of my university peers earn double my teaching salary and some of this differential would easily pay for an equivalent pension.
     
  4. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I was never a high flying accountant or a city banker but have worked in both public and private sectorsand teaching isn't by any means the cushy option.
     
  5. The Red Heron

    The Red Heron New commenter

    Never said teaching was cushy...I dont find it particularly difficult and am normally home by 5 everyday, do no work at home and at weekends and take my full 13 weeks off a year. So I think I have a good deal. I earn nearly 36k a year, more than most in my town. In no way can I say I have 'crappy' terms and conditions. No wonder people in this profession have reputations like sewer rats
     
  6. You should only lose 1/365 of gross annual salary. If correct, your figure implies that you are paid almost £55,000 and you might reasonably absorb into your budget a loss of only £150!

     
  7. LOL - think you need some comrehension skills intervention. Where in that post do I say teachers are badly paid? In fact, I commented that that is where we will end up if we don't act now; quite the opposite!
    I suspect you are a troll, but your last comment is very telling. You <u>should </u>be comparing your hours, pay and T&Cs with equally qualified people who work in the professions. When you compare there, we are paid significantly less, and do not have especially better T&Cs.
     
  8. Doh! Cross-posted there.
     
  9. As you get away with working so few hours, perhaps you just don't do a very good job...
     
  10. No one is saying that they are hard done by under the current regime. It's the swingeing and vindictive nature of these cuts that people object to.
    On an related note, pay, pension and holidaysdo not insulate a teacher from dealing with harrowing CP issues (regularly in many schools), children who are often recalcitrant teenager-in-waiting, occasionally aggressive parents, not to mention the often pointless initiatives and steady eroison of professional autonomy.
     
  11. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Did anyone say you did?
    I was merely stating a fact having many years experience working in the private sector and as a teacher.
    How many of those in your town who earn less spent 4 years getting a degree ?
     
  12. High five, MillieBear! [​IMG]
     
  13. veritytrue

    veritytrue New commenter

    You sound like a bit of a lazy g*t who leaves the work to people round you - no wonder you've chip on your shoulder about all the people on your course who worked so hard compared with you who scraped through.

     
  14. The Red Heron

    The Red Heron New commenter

    Ok ok..Im clearly not going to get anywhere with people so blinded on a teaching forum. I do a very good job, at least my colleagues, the LEA, SMTs, parents and Ofsted tell me I do anyway.
    Yes, lets all strike...I cant want to tell my brother whose been out of work for 8 months and has sent off for 22 job applications, heard nothing, that in fact, Im very hard done by and the govt are treating me terribly badly.
    Like I said..no wonder our public standing continues the lowest of the low when hard working families are hearing this cr.ap constantly
     
  15. veritytrue

    veritytrue New commenter

    Paying you peanuts isn't going to get your brother a job. tbh paying you peanuts sounds far too much.
     
  16. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Would you like to tell my son who was made redundant from his job 2 years ago and after hundreds (yes hundreds) of job applications has just started working for less than he would get in unemployment benefit? because he would laugh at you!
     
  17. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter

    I have thank you.

    I wouldn't say you were in the 'real world' though if your private pension was better than your public one. That doesn't apply to many people.
     
  18. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter

    Like who? We certainly don't come close to doctors or lawyers. Who else do you mean?
     
  19. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Have you checked?
    I wasn't in a high flying position and certainly wasn't an exception with regards to pension.
     
  20. Just wondering how Red Heron manages to do such a good job and be home by 5, doing no work in the evenings or weekends? If hes having such a cushy time of it I'm not surprised he cant see why the rest of us are striking!
     

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