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Why do so many teachers object to going on strike?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by salix, Jun 18, 2011.

  1. lardylegs

    lardylegs Occasional commenter

    a) There are many teachers who think "Ooh, but what about the kiddies?" because they are soft ***.
    b) There are many teachers who think "Ooh, but what will the HT think of me?" because they are sycophants.
    c) There are many teachers who think "Ooh, but Jesus wants me to suffer the little children," because they are Christians.
    d) There are many teachers who think, "Ooh, but I don't really understand this Union stuff and I certainly don't want to lose a day's pay" because they are thick.

     
  2. Correct.
    The "I'm doing it for the kids" mentality actually undermines our profession because too many teachers just lie down and take the rubbish foisted upon us. It's actually downright spineless. Just look at the so-called SATs boycott last year.
     
  3. But lardylegs hit the nail on the head :) Well said!
     
  4. Lardylegs - many Christians wouldn't consider a day's strike here and there a cause of suffering to children. Many of them believe that standing up to injustice is really important - more so than losing a day's pay.

    I completely agree with your points 'b' and 'd' though.
     
  5. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

  6. veritytrue

    veritytrue New commenter

    Gove has said that part of the reason for setting up acadamies is to undermine national pay agreements. To those people who don't want to take action over the pension proposals I say, are you going to accept the removal of PPA or your salary being allowed to fall in real terms because year on year it doesn't keep pace with inflation? When is enough enough? You can say that you joined a union as an insurance policy or that you don't believe in taking any action because, after all private sector employees are in a worse situation. That has happened because workers' rights in the private sector have been whittled away. Just don't be surprised to see PPA threatened, the value of your salary fall and your terms and conditions continuing to worsen. Will you have given the Government any reason at all to think it can't do all of those things and more besides?
     
  7. Just a point. What happended to solidarity?
    I have voted to strike and hope to, but I am the only member in school of the two unions who have balloted. Why can't they get their acts together and all strike at the same time? Just me going on strike won't really affect anyone in my school so I feel pretty useless in 'real' terms. Actually I am angry at the unions for not talking to each other and organising a strike so that we can all stand together!

     
  8. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter

    What about the teachers that realise the strike probably won't change anything and will just make the government's position stronger. Some would say the only way a strike like this would work is if the public are on the side of the teachers. They quite clearly are not.
     
  9. Are these teachers who 'realise the strike probably won't change anything' just going to shrug their shoulders, accept the pension proposals without question and wait for the next hammer blow?
     
  10. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter

    I don't know, you'll have to ask them. What if the strike does turn the public even further against teachers. Will those who decide to strike accept they have made a mistake?
     
  11. cally1980

    cally1980 Established commenter

    What would be the consequences of a further turn in public opinion if this were to be the case?
     
  12. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    are they going to refuse the benefits if it does make a difference?
     
  13. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter

    Probably not. Has everyone who voted Conservative in the past turned down any gains Labour might have given to teachers, or vice versa for that matter?
     
  14. The Red Heron

    The Red Heron New commenter

    Err because I dont want to lose £150 for 6 hrs 'work'
    As I explained last night at a party when asked, when coming from a working class background where my grandfather worked down the pit for 50 years....whingeing moaning parasites from the teaching profession (who already get a better pension than most, work fewer hours and get a quarter of the year off )dont really do a lot for me, funnily enough
     
  15. veritytrue

    veritytrue New commenter

    You'll be losing a lot more than that!
     
  16. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    more than a little hypocritical don't you think ?
     
  17. The Red Heron

    The Red Heron New commenter

    Pointless strike, pointless people going on it...I thank god most days I have a job which pays me a decent wage, get every evening/weekend and summer free...so no, I wont be striking. I like to live in the real world amidst raising umemployment and redundancies
     
  18. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter

    Don't talk about the real world here. This is a forum for teachers.
     
  19. The Red Heron

    The Red Heron New commenter

    ha ha...yes indeed..it still scares me that there are honestly people out there who think that working 50 hrs a week and the occasional weekend/evening, getting a 14% contribution govt pension and 13 weeks a year holiday makes them hard done by
    I shudder to think how insular and professionally tunneled vision they are
     
  20. LOL - so what you're actually saying is that because most other people have crappy pay and ****** T&Cs, we should too and be grateful and accept everything the Government says we must!
     

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