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Why do so many teachers object to going on strike?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by salix, Jun 18, 2011.

  1. Why do so many teachers object to going on strike?
     
  2. Why do so many teachers object to going on strike?
     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I don't think anyone takes strike action lightly and even those of us who intend to support our unions aren't happy with the idea of striking.
     
  4. nick909

    nick909 Lead commenter

    I think the main reason is where the current climate means that we look like a right bunch of ungrateful whingers where other people are in far worse situations. Teachers are already the lowest common denominator as far as some people are concerned, through misrepresentation in some of the press, and this won't help one jot.
    I'm striking as I feel I have to in order to support my union, even though I oppose the strike. I don't wish to leave the union though as I feel that the others are too submissive. I'm still not looking forward to looking the parents of my class in the eye and telling them I'm striking because I'm not happy with my still very good pension scheme, when some of them have been unemployed for months.
     
  5. nick909 why does it particularly matter if some people think teachers are the lowest common denominator?
     
  6. Coz they are bleeding heart wimps?

     
  7. Indeed Happy Pixie
    I wonder whether its got more to do with how they think they will be perceived at their schools and wrapping it up in 'oohh I don't believe in strikes'
    What also concerns me is that the countries who are undergoing the worst kind of abuse by their governments for attempting to protest must wonder what it's all for.
    I just don't believe that one of the richest economies in the world who is not greatly affected by what's going on in Euroland and can afford millions for one damned wedding has to wield this axe. We are NOT a soft target, we work bloody hard and are constantly judged by people who have no idea what education is really like.
    I honestly believe they are increasing the retirement age to 66 so we're so knackered by that time we'll all drop dead within two years of retiring so they don't have to pay us anything!!
    Rant over...phew!!
     
  8. You have to think of this in the context of the national economy though. Most people in the private sector don't belong to a union, and wouldn't dream of joining one or striking. By comparison, teachers look like raving militants!
    The fact that workers in the private sector are routinely shafted by their employers when it comes to T&Cs and pensions, is one of the reasons I became a teacher after a long time spent working in the City.
     
  9. greta444

    greta444 New commenter

    Because strikes don't work. Striking won't change a single thing. Get on with your job which is to educate children. We already have a better pension than a lot of people.
     
  10. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Really?
    I know I was in a union and took strike action when I worked in the private sector
     
  11. Union membership in the private sector is rare - especially in London, and even more especially in the financial sector.
    ONS suggest about 15% of private sector works are members of a union. When was the last time you heard about a mass private sector march through London in protest about pay and conditions?
     
  12. We have a better pension than most because we've fought for it - mostly via the unions. Stop fighting for it and you will lose it. Then we'll have the same rubbish pensions as our colleagues in the private sector...except we'll also be getting comparatively a lot less pay as well.
    The number of U turns recently by the government suggest they are very sensitive to public reaction. The reason strikes often don't work, is simply because not enough people take part.
     
  13. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Really ?
    ACCORD ?
     
  14. I'm not sure what point you're making or asking? I assume you're referring to the Lloyds Bank affiliated union?
     
  15. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    advance
    Aegis
    Unite

     
  16. Yes, they're all private sector unions. Unfortunately, not too many private sector workers belong to them.
    My point is, that while about 15% of private sector workers join a union, the vast majority of teachers (and other public sector workers) do so. This is the big difference between the sectors when it comes to union membership and striking.
     
  17. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter

    It's this type of comment that shows how out of sync many teachers are with the rest of the country. I agree that the government is sensitive to public reaction. The thing is though, they have the public fully on their side. The general public have very little sympathy for teachers in this case. Go on any non education related web forum and you will find loads of responses from people knocking the proposed strike.
     
  18. Why should bankers, who caused the the economic crisis in the first place and have had to be bailed out, get fat bonuses for ruining the country while people who work hard have to pay more every month, so they can retire later and have less money per year. It is not just teachers that are affected which is why public sector workers and civil servants are striking too. If every body just sat back and said oh never mind, im alright jack then the government will keep on screwing the average person while the rich keep on getting richer. One way to raise money is to put taxes up on the super rich, but that would affect people like the prime minister!
     
  19. Isn't that because not enough people do them?
     
  20. Jellybellysmum you have hit the nail on the head!
    My previous pension in the private sector was non-contributary - I transferred it when I became a teacher because at the time I thought it was a good scheme - now feel screwed!
    I dont give a damn what the public/parents think about me striking, sometimes enough is enough !
     

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