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Why do so many of you want to become teachers?

Discussion in 'Scotland - prospective teachers' started by deleted963, Jan 11, 2011.

  1. Do you not know that there are no jobs in Scotland?
    Do you not know that there are unlikely to be any jobs in Scotland for years to come?
    Do you not know that teacher numbers are being reduced in Scotland?
    Do you not know that there is a huge surplus of unemployed teachers in Scotland?
    Do you not know that terms and conditions are being targeted by employers?
    Do you not know that there is likely to be strike action by teachers for the first time in a generation?
    Are things so bad in other industries that teaching is perceived as a "viable" option?
     
  2. Do you not know that it's not compulsory to work in Scotland having trained there?
    I think most people that are applying want to work in the industry enough that it wouldn't matter to them where they did it and I would question the commitment of anyone who gave up on being a teacher because of the prospect of having to relocate!
     
  3. I am so fed up reading about your rants on here bigjimmy - it was the same last year. I am not quite sure why you feel you need to comment on decisions being made by people that you do not even know. Everyone is well aware of the current situation - indeed to have any hope of even getting a place on a course most of us have spent a significant period of time volunteering in schools and speaking to people currently in the profession. At some point you obviously decided teaching was for you - we all have our own individual reasons for wanting to teach. Personally, I am taking a long term view on it and as I am self employed it is not like I have to give up a job or anything to complete the course. i am very passionate about education and would hope to pass on this passion and enthusiasm to my pupils. If I were a parent of one of your pupils I would be extremely worried about the negativity you must portray in the classroom. Anyone trying to go into teaching at the moment has thought longer and harder than i dare say most in previous years have. Perhaps you could either give constructive advice on this forum or steer clear of it - nothing you say is news to anyone on here.
     
  4. Im sorry but regardless of if there is jobs or not I want to be a Teacher and it is something I have wanted to be since I first touched a computer. Scotland has one of the world's best education systems and renowned for their PGDE training. Im English I rather go to Scotland to train and as much as I want a job in Scotland after I am comforted to know that I am going to get one of the best Educations in the world with the best training compared to the English PGCEs.

    There are jobs all over the world if you are willing to move for it. If I can't get a job in Scotland I will do just that. This is what I love, this is what I want to do and I will fight happily for it. Maybe constructive criticism would be more helpful here instead of a twisted bitter person mouthing about something that is only one country out of many other options. I really feel sorry (if you are lucky enough to have a job) for the pupils you are teaching. The negativity must be seeping out of you...
     
  5. amysdad

    amysdad New commenter

    @bigjimmy -
    My wife is a primary school teacher, having recently retrained and admits to being one of the "lucky ones" from her year in getting a permanent job straight after probation.
    My mother, auntie, and uncle were all secondary teachers, at either APT or PT level (yes, pre-McCrone.)
    I am currently in a position where I can influence directly education policy and spend through my local council.
    I reckon I'm pretty well placed to understand the pitfalls and problems current trainees face. But I still want to do it.
    Why?
    Because what I've seen, through my family and my own experiences, is the difference a teacher can make to a child. I'm fed up in a job where there's no obvious benefit - if you can't get some sort of fulfilment from teaching, from that moment when the wave of understanding crosses a pupil's face or where you see a child performing to the best of their ability, then you probably shouldn't be in the job. I'd like to think that I can make that difference - maybe I can, maybe not.
    I know there's pressure. I know that teachers are often subject to ridiculous decisions made by people who simply don't understand the role, or what's expected of them. I know that the behaviour of kids can make a class hell. But, believe me, that's no different to the stress I get in my current job.
    I know that, in two and a half years time, I could find myself without a job, or scrabbling around to find supply - and with a mortgage and family, that's a big risk. But I'm prepared to take the risk because I believe I can make that difference and can add something with my experience to education.
    That's why I want to become a teacher.
     
  6. Bigjimmy I really don't need to respond to your message given that the people before me have said what I was thinking and pretty much put you in your place but I couldn't help myself!
    You would have to be living under a rock to be unaware of the things going on in the education sector right now - but if you don't follow your dreams you're always left with the 'what if' feeling. Noone is trying to get into teaching because they want to see themselves unemployed a couple of years down the line... myself and I'm sure many others feel passionate about education and learning and have thought long and hard about the career move. You only get one life - you need to make the most of it and do what makes you happy - whether you approve of this or not is neither here nor there!
     
  7. Wow, this has grown arms and legs in the past few hours.
    My reason for asking was curiosity as to why there are still so many people wanting to teach, given the well-known problems in education and the public sector in general.
    The vast majority of people who train in Scotland have, in the recent past at least, ended up teaching in the country. A few do end up teaching in other areas of the UK or abroad, so, yes, my points about the job situation in Scotland just now were relevant and valid. Of course I know that it's not compulsory to work in Scotland having trained there.
    I would imagine that it does matter to those people applying to teacher training where they did it if, for example, they had children, a house that needed to be sold, elderly parents that needed looking after, and so on.
    Mobility is high for the young, free and singles - but not for almost anyone else and that's why I question anna's "I think most people that are applying want to work in the industry enough that it wouldn't matter to them where they did it". Does anyone have figures for Scotland-trained, Scotland-employed versus Scotland-trained, elsewhere-employed?
    I certainly would not "question the commitment of anyone who gave up on being a teacher because of the prospect of having to relocate!" - especially if you don't know the individual's circumstances that make relocation difficult.
     
  8. Mr Primrose, I am sorry that you are fed up with my comments. I have never ranted in my life. You may not like what I have to say or assume that I "feel I need to comment on decisions being made by people that you do not even know". This is an anonymous public forum and, if I remember correctly, a free country with free speech. If the level of your argument is to state how much you despise what I have to say then I would suggest you either ignore what I have to say or argue the points I have made in a grown-up manner.
    "I were a parent of one of your pupils I would be extremely worried about the negativity you must portray in the classroom".
    Negativity? Must?
    Isn't it ironic that you - at present an unqualified member of the public - can judge my teaching ability based on what I have to say about teacher unemployment on an anonymous public forum?
    Isn't it ironic that you - at present an unqualified member of the public - judges the teaching ability of someone that you do not even know? Your own words, remember?
    Isn't it ironic that my pupils and I, from S1 to S6, get on really well with each other and that my pupils achieve exam grades comparable to those in private schools - and that's the entire social spectrum of pupils from Int1 to Advanced Higher?
    Any advice I have given has been constructive and who are you to speak for others on this forum? I will remain and contribute as much and as often as I please. I suggest you take your own advice and steer clear.
    And finally Mr Primrose, note that I did not proffer any advice at the start of this thread. Any chance of answering the questions I asked?
     
  9. Nats - see my previous post to Mr Primrose.
    Also, brush up on your grammar and spelling if you want to be a teacher, don't blame your mistakes on typos because they're not.
    Teachers communicate with their students through verbal and written language and you don't want to be passing on bad practice to the people you may possibly teach at some point in the future.
     
  10. Amysdad - thanks for answering my questions (at last!). What you say is very similar to my own reasons for becoming a teacher. Best of luck in the future!
     
  11. Is that me put in my place, orchid, is it? You could have fooled me.
    Who said I don't approve of doing things that make you happy? You are making this up, aren't you?
    Oh, and any chance of answering those questions I asked in Post #1?
     
  12. bigjimmy - it is not Mr Primrose, I am not a mere 'unqualified member of the public' and unlike your rants at 'all of us' my comment regarding your negativity relates directly to you and the manner in which you come across on this forum. Finally, I believe my comments to you were perfectly justifiable. My apologies to anyone else on this forum who may think I was speaking on their behalf - purely my own observations. You will no doubt continue to make comments on this forum about the employment situation (as you do so often) and good luck to you. I will continue to use this forum to gain advice and information from like minded people who are actually on to help.
     
  13. Are you a qualified teacher Mrs Primrose? If not then you are wrong, and you are indeed "a mere unqualified member of the public" in all things education.
    Point out a single rant of mine, especially to "all of you". Apparently I've been ranting on this forum for years so it shouldn't be too difficult to find at least one example.
    I too will continue to use this forum to gain advice and information from like minded people who are actually on to help.
    Good luck to you too.
     
  14. sbf

    sbf

    No apologies needed.
     
  15. Wow! Looks like we're getting some feisty, on-the-ball, committed, perceptive, well-informed students next year! Can't wait to work with you all!
     
  16. Wow! Looks like we're getting some feisty, on-the-ball, committed, perceptive, well-informed lecturer next year! Can't wait!
     
  17. Shucks! [​IMG]
     
  18. Although, I don't agree with bigjimmy's negativity, I do take Voltaire's view that: "I despise what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it." (if not too dramatic!) It is only, after all, a forum where everyone has a right to post their opinion and take from it what they will.
    In my own opinion, I would encourage anyone who has an ambition to become a teacher to follow it through. The only piece of advice I would give is to 'cast your net' wider when lookin for a job as I had to do; there are jobs if you're willing to travel or relocate.
     
  19. If they introduced psychometric tests in Scotland, or my personal favourite - lie detector tests, then there would be jobs for those who have had a lifelong ambition to teach!
    i am not one of those who has had 3 or more kids and SUDDENLY decide in their thirties or forties that they want to be a teacher. That realy angers me. Nor am I someone who has a degree in something like Marine Biology then decide to train as a primary teacher.
    I may sound bitter but i have every right to be. I am young, I have worked with children for more than 4 years, have a degree in a child-related capacity and plenty experience with primary children, as well as knowing the Curriculum for Excellence inside out. However, I don't even get an interview for Glasgow or Strathclyde, whilst those, like stated above, waltz in and get offered a place!!!!!
    It is ridiculous. I don't care if I don't have a job straight away after the probation year or if I have to relocate, I have wanted to teach since I myself was in primary school.
    Fish out those who only do it for the status, money, holidays, because they're a bored housewive, middle-age crisis etc

     

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