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Why am i still so 'ethnic'?!!!!

Discussion in 'Personal' started by anon4561, Apr 17, 2011.

  1. I was doing some sorting out in my study today, and found the passport that i used to come to Australia. I"ve been here for seventeen years now! Have just spent the last five days or so, away camping, and visited a couple of different little touristy towns, and it started again...... "So, how are you enjoying Australia? Are you here for long?" as well as blank incomprehension ....I asked a waiter if I could look at his phone book..... he looked at me blankly and then said hopefully "Oh, you want a TOOTH PICK?" Eh...no..... a phone book, please. The kids at school don't understand everything I say... OH still misunderstands me.... It's not as if I'm speaking broad Glaswegian! I speak twice as slowly as I would at home, and try to enunciate my words carefully... but am still regularly misunderstood. I'm proud to be Scottish...... but should i consider having elocution lessons from an Australian, to make my life a bit easier?!
     
  2. I was doing some sorting out in my study today, and found the passport that i used to come to Australia. I"ve been here for seventeen years now! Have just spent the last five days or so, away camping, and visited a couple of different little touristy towns, and it started again...... "So, how are you enjoying Australia? Are you here for long?" as well as blank incomprehension ....I asked a waiter if I could look at his phone book..... he looked at me blankly and then said hopefully "Oh, you want a TOOTH PICK?" Eh...no..... a phone book, please. The kids at school don't understand everything I say... OH still misunderstands me.... It's not as if I'm speaking broad Glaswegian! I speak twice as slowly as I would at home, and try to enunciate my words carefully... but am still regularly misunderstood. I'm proud to be Scottish...... but should i consider having elocution lessons from an Australian, to make my life a bit easier?!
     
  3. lilachardy

    lilachardy Star commenter

    Nah - be proud of your heritage and stick with it!
     
  4. I AM proud of my heritage..... I even tell the kids at school that if I say "Haud yer wheesht!" it is a polite Scottish way of asking them to be quiet (hah!) I just get tired of being given the wrong items in shops and the wrong drinks in pubs! (I do a lot of pointing.......)
     
  5. lurk_much

    lurk_much Occasional commenter

    17 years and not learnt the language.
    Not exactly assimilation is it?


     
  6. That's my point! I'd love to keep a wee bit of my accent...but assimilate more! I just want to be understood......I want to have a 'cute' and still recognizable accent, but not be told regularly "Oh, you're still very broad, aren't you?"! Scots seem to have a problem losing their accents.... have met Glaswegians who've lived here for thirty years, and who still speak broad Glaswegian!
     
  7. I was in a telephone conversation with an Aussie yesterday (he was coming to pick a pair of gates up...not from Aus ,obviously). All the way through the conversation I kept thinking for goodness sake Baubs do not say "no worries, cobber...DO NOT SAY NO WORRIES COBBER ."
    Guess what I said at the end of the conversation? :¬((
     
  8. Lol! Scottish friends say that I sound Australian! Have picked up that curious Aussie habit of making everything sound like a question? As well as my tendency to refer to the school hens as 'chooks' .......... and say I'm a bit 'crook' if I'm not feeling well?
     
  9. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    If you want to be understood there then you have to speak Aussie. When I speak to my grandsons in Sydney I have to speak with the same accent as theirs or they don't understand me.
     
  10. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    It's an easy accent to pick up. Lived there for 6 months and had it bad when I came back. There was a knock at the door - the Salvation army. "Dad, it's the Salvos at the door".
    I love the Australian accent!
     
  11. It is possible to do all.
    I speak German most of the time.
    I still have my Northern accent when speaking English (ask Lily or manashee!).
    But when teaching English, I speak "standard" English, albeit my vowels are not quite as long as those of a Southerner.
    You can keep your heritage - but if you live abroad, your heritage is not all that important to those around you.
    You need to learn to except that - you have moved there, not them to you.
     
  12. accept
     
  13. Honestly... I've tried! I cannot put on accents.......I've met other Scots (and Irish) and we seem to have problems losing our accents. I've deliberately dropped all my Scottish words, I'm not running around saying "dreich", and "skelf" and 'drouth" (words that I had never even realized that other people wouldn't understand) My mother insisted when we were growing up that we speak 'properly' i.e. no glottal stops, and no dropping the 'g' at the end of 'ing' words. So I'm fairly well spoken....... it's just my accent. OH studied phonetics in the past and his attempts to make me sound Aussie have ended in hilarity. So it's not that I'm stubbornly sticking to my accent.... i am half-seriously considering elocution lessons!
    It's fine most of the time as the locals know me, and starting pouring my drink as I walk into the pub, and reaching for my brand of cigarettes as I approach the counter..... it was just being in a tourist town and being treated like a tourist and being misunderstood all over again, frustrated me. When I come home to Scotland, I start picking up the natural rhythms of my language again, and I'm totally incomprehensible to my friends here when I first come back, until I learn to slow down and enunciate again..... so I do try.
     
  14. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    It's odd - when I was in Australia I visited Perth, Alice, Sydney and Brisbane and had no trouble having my Glasgow accent understood anywhere I went. In fact I was disappointed that no-one seemed surprised to hear a Glaswegian accent.
    Keep in mind that Glaswegian has been deemed the accent of choice for a number of tele-sales companies because research has found that it sounds trustworthy and friendly - be proud of it!
     
  15. Thanks Seren! I find that strange, because, as I said, 17 years later..... I speak slowly, and still get misunderstood regularly..... having said that, the places you mentioned are large tourist centres, so maybe more used to Scottish people? I've also been told that I speak very quietly (used to get told that when I was still in Glasgow) so maybe that's half the problem. I've lived in small towns, where they're not so used to overseas visitors. I was asked when I first arrived here, what my first language was!
     
  16. But, when I started at this school, just over a year ago, a few staff members said to me "!6 years?! You're still very broad aren't you!" Kids ask me to quote lines from Shrek "Hey! Get oot o' ma swamp!" and Taggart "There's been a murder"!
     
  17. I just can't do accents! I can nearly get an Irish one, but American, English and Australian ones are beyond me! I can do a French accent... if I'm speaking French, (though very possibly sounds hilarious to French people) but I'm just carp at anything else!
     
  18. LOL, Blazer..... "Ah wiz cleanin' oot ma study...." Is that any better? [​IMG] All ok now that I've been back in my 'home' town for a couple of days..... sorry, was just having a rant. after being treated like a tourist! x
     

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