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Who's been bitten by a dog?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by modelmaker, May 4, 2012.

  1. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    I was, a couple of days ago, and it wasn't from my dog. Fortunately I didn't have her with me at the time or a bloodbath might have ensued.
    So here's the scenario:
    I'm walking to the shop and hear a wierd noise like someone slapping a strap, otherwise, the village is quiet. I cross the road to shorten my journey and as I pass a house with a high hedge, the gate opens to free 3 large dogs, all on leashes struggling to get through the gap at the same time.
    The imbecile who thinks he'll be able to control these 3 large dogs is shouting at them as I walk past, and the one nearest me gets spooked by my presence and grabs a bite of my leg towarn me off.
    I notice my jeans have a 2" gash in them and complain about it to the guy who apologises, but he's got his work cut out trying to control the dogs, so I decide to continue my journey.
    Then when I get home, I find that the dog has drawn blood. Two mnor incisions in my leg. I look on the interweb to find out what the consequesnces of a dog bite might be and I learn that the most significant risk at the moment is in the spread of MRSA.
    So I call the surgery, because I'm due to have my operation next week and think I ought to do the decent thing because I was cleared of MRSA in the pre-op visit. The doctor says i just need an update on a tetanus jab, and that's it.
    Ok, for me it's not much of a problem other than a limp as I climb the stairs, but I'm haunted by the thought that if the event occured ten minutes later when they chucked kids out of primary school, it probably wouldn't have been my leg that got bit, but a kid's face.
    Or, as I said earlier, if I had my dog with me at the time, it would have been a blood bath.
    So what do I do about it? Make a complaint to the police that might result in a dog getting destroyed and the owner fined and get help?
    You've probably gathered, I'm ok with dogs. Why can't it be the other way round? Destroy the **** owners and rehabilitate the dogs?
     
  2. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    I was, a couple of days ago, and it wasn't from my dog. Fortunately I didn't have her with me at the time or a bloodbath might have ensued.
    So here's the scenario:
    I'm walking to the shop and hear a wierd noise like someone slapping a strap, otherwise, the village is quiet. I cross the road to shorten my journey and as I pass a house with a high hedge, the gate opens to free 3 large dogs, all on leashes struggling to get through the gap at the same time.
    The imbecile who thinks he'll be able to control these 3 large dogs is shouting at them as I walk past, and the one nearest me gets spooked by my presence and grabs a bite of my leg towarn me off.
    I notice my jeans have a 2" gash in them and complain about it to the guy who apologises, but he's got his work cut out trying to control the dogs, so I decide to continue my journey.
    Then when I get home, I find that the dog has drawn blood. Two mnor incisions in my leg. I look on the interweb to find out what the consequesnces of a dog bite might be and I learn that the most significant risk at the moment is in the spread of MRSA.
    So I call the surgery, because I'm due to have my operation next week and think I ought to do the decent thing because I was cleared of MRSA in the pre-op visit. The doctor says i just need an update on a tetanus jab, and that's it.
    Ok, for me it's not much of a problem other than a limp as I climb the stairs, but I'm haunted by the thought that if the event occured ten minutes later when they chucked kids out of primary school, it probably wouldn't have been my leg that got bit, but a kid's face.
    Or, as I said earlier, if I had my dog with me at the time, it would have been a blood bath.
    So what do I do about it? Make a complaint to the police that might result in a dog getting destroyed and the owner fined and get help?
    You've probably gathered, I'm ok with dogs. Why can't it be the other way round? Destroy the **** owners and rehabilitate the dogs?
     
  3. Me. I still have the scar on my finger knuckle.
    The dog was put down (which actually saddened me, as it was my fault - I had unwittingly scared the dog, but I was only a kid).
    The owner of the dog was the one who made the decision, we did not request for it to be done, nor involve the police.
    I am not sure what I would do in your case, MM, but I would be inclined to report it, simply because your account implies that the owner was not capable of controlling the dogs. Perhaps he should stick to just having one.

     
  4. NellyFUF

    NellyFUF Lead commenter

    You have to report it. It is not much to imagine that injuries could have happened to a child who was walking past or maybe,, to another person's dog who was just walking past. It is not acceptable.
     
  5. camis

    camis New commenter

    Yes - my daughter was bitten on the face by a friend's dog 5 years ago, outside the village store. Still has the scar where the dog's tooth ripped her top lip open, Thankfully it didn't get a hold on her cheek and she only had a graze there rather than it ripping her cheek off.

    We didn't report it and friend still has said dog, although she doesn't take it up to the school gates any more...
     
  6. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    I entirely agree it isn't acceptable, Nelly, but who do you punish most? The dog or the owner?

     
  7. but if you don't, the person you punish most is the next person who gets bitten by the dog - and has been pointed out, that could be a child who could be seriously damaged
    so - not dog or owner
    but dog or victim
    i wish that wasn't your choice - but it is
     
  8. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    I was visiting my future in-laws for the first time. I knew they had a small dog and that it was getting more tetchy in its old age, with failing eyesight.
    I'm not particularly at ease around dogs and cats but Mr jubilee told me that if I just stroked the dog as she sat on the floor she wouldn't try to jump up on my lap.
    I was taken into the lounge and coffee was served. The dog settled near me and I tentatively stroked her. She growled, turned her head quickly and bit through my thumbnail.
    I half-fainted on the sofa.
    The dog was tied up outside whenever I visited after that and was eventually put down as she had a tendency to bite the ankles of postmen wearing brown footwear!
     
  9. mandala1

    mandala1 Occasional commenter

    Yes - big alsation. I have the scars on my abdomen. The owners thought it was funny.
     
  10. Bethannie

    Bethannie New commenter

    I have been bitten.
    I was visiting a couple I knew and they had their dog shut in the kitchen. I could hear the whining followd by barking followed by howls and then back to whining and was told 'she doesn't like strangers - it's best we keep her in the kitchen for now.'
    Shortly before I left thier teenage son came hom, went to the kitchen for a can of pop and the dog shot out of the kitchen. She was a scrappy little terrier and small enough to be snatched up by her owner as she hurled herself into the lounge. I gathered up my belongings and ,ade ready to leave. I left a book on the table, and the dog-holder picked it up and held it out to me...I reached for the book and the dog wriggled free enough to bite my hand.
    The owners cleaned up my hand - the dog had bitten deep enough to draw blood and made sure I went to the GP the next day to have the wound checked and see if I needed a tetanus boost.
    The dog was muzzled in company from then on, and she and her two adult owners attended a behaviour course. I was happy with this - it showed me that the owners were doing what they could to ensure their dog was safe - and the fact that they both went to the training course with her indicated that they accepted responsibility too. They took appropriate measures to ensure noone else was bitten.
    I think this is what is missing in the scenario described in the OP. There is nothing to say that the dog will be prevented from attacking again.I think I would report the incident - for the safety of others.

     
  11. lurk_much

    lurk_much Occasional commenter

    There is hardly a variety of dog that hasn't bitten me.
    Okay an exageration but half a dozen different bites over the years.
    Mainly while working in other people's houses.
    I would set a weight limit, (say ten kilos?) for dogs. Kill the rest.
     
  12. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    From my experience, larger dogs tend to be more docile than stamp ons, but it's madness to even think you could try to control more than one at a time.
     
  13. lurk_much

    lurk_much Occasional commenter

    sorry
    too harsh
    but please control your dog
     
  14. lurk_much

    lurk_much Occasional commenter

    wouldn't it be more realistic to accept that some dogs are going to bite some people so the ones that attack ankles are preferable?
     
  15. I am a huge dog lover but if one of my dogs ever bit anyone I would, despite the fact it would break my heart, have it put down.

    Clearly the owner was/is not in control of their dogs and should be reported. Just think what could happen next time if it was a child walking past or an old lady with her little Yorkshire terrier for example. Some peopler should just not have dogs - simple really.
     
  16. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    You mean the type of dogs people walk attached to 25 metre long retractable leads?
    My dog has a strong, strap-type lead you could tow a car with. It's long enough for her to walk without getting under my feet, and when I pass other people, I use my other hand to shorten it and keep her close and under control. It would be impossible to do this with two dogs.
     
  17. Doglover

    Doglover Occasional commenter

    You should report it to the police, MM - and of course, it is the owner who is to blame and not the dogs.
    The incidence of dog bites has risen alarmingly, and it is mainly down to irresponsible ownership.
    This makes me very sad.
    There is a pressing need for change to the current legislation, but I fear the government have not acted on the best opportunity they have ever had to do so.
     
  18. Doglover

    Doglover Occasional commenter

    Oh and yes, I have had a few dog bites - one which was particularly nasty which I got while my sister and I tried to split up our own dogs when they were fighting. It ended up quite badly infected and needed treatment.
    My own dog bites me often while grooming, She absolutely hates having her ears brushed - but it has to be done. They are usually just little nips, but because I bruise easily due to a medical condition, they actually look much, much worse than they are.
    Dogs bite, that's what they do. But owners have to minimise the risks.
    Incidentally, my dog has never bitten anyone else.
     
  19. I'd report it, to save someone else being bitten

    having said that, I'm afraid my dog is an ankle-biter... he was abused in the past, and is now very territorial, but only with males. I know this about him, so am careful to keep him on a leash when any new male friends visit, until he gets used to them

    It's about responsible ownership, and it doesn't sound as if this person is
     
  20. giraffe

    giraffe New commenter

    A few months ago, my daughter was walking home when a doberman leapt out of the owner's garden and siezed a smaller dog that was being walked on a lead past the house by an elderly couple. The little dog was ripped up and killed there and then.
    Horrible.
     

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