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Which is the greatest Alfred Hitchcock movie ever?

Discussion in 'Personal' started by TheHistoryGuy, May 8, 2011.

  1. Which is the pot-bellied master of suspense's greatest movie? I love them all, but here are some of my favourites.
    Psycho? Anthony Perkin's greatest role. Bernard Herrman's score brings out the best of this film. Hitchcock creates the slasher genre.
    Vertigo? Maybe James Stewart's greatest role. Bernard Herrman gets inspiration from Wagner's Tristan and Isolde for maybe his greatest score. Anyone who says Hitchcock isn't emotionally invoving might reconsider after watching this.
    Spellbound? Ingrid Bergman is heavenly. Always find this film very moving, along with Vertigo.
    Rear Window? Classic hitchcock suspense. James Stewart is great as usual.
    The Birds? Tippi Hedren is wondereful here.
    North by Northwest? For some classic Hitchcock set pieces, such as the airplane attack and fight on Mount Rushmore.
    The 39 Steps? Black and white classic suspense.
    The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956 version)? James Stewart and Doris Day a perfect match.
    Torn Curtain? Doesn't quite work, and I always end up feeling liek the East Germans have been cheated, but still find this movie strangly enjoyable.
    Topaz? This one, like Torn Curtain to a lesse extent, tends to get slated. Its almost like three fims patched together, but always find it strangley enjoyable again.
    Frenzy? His penultimate movie was the most violent, and the most disturbing, but a great performance from Jon Finch.
     
  2. Rear Window for its watchability

    Rope for its technical brilliance
     
  3. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    The Birds and Psycho really scared me when I was a young un. I find it quite interesting that to this very day, film directors are still emulating his suspense style. Sorry, can't remmember off- hand which modern films I have spotted this in, but the Hitchcock effect lives on.
     
  4. kibosh

    kibosh Star commenter

    Eeek!
     
  5. I still think Strangers on a Train beats them all hands down. It's such a great plot line and the execution of it is fantastic. It's always my first choice when teaching British Cinema.
     
  6. Rear Window is my favourite film of all time - I just love the way Hitchcock captures the oppressive heat and pressure building up in the courtyard. Grace Kelly is such a stylish beauty icon and Jimmy Stewart so the conformed bachelor that you know she will bag him in the end.

    This thread has just made me remeber all of the films I used to love and watch repeatedly - now it's time to dig out the DVDs. [​IMG]
     
  7. doomzebra

    doomzebra Occasional commenter

    For me, the elegance of North by Northwest makes it a winner.

    That said, I will happily watch pretty much any of them
     
  8. Bethannie

    Bethannie New commenter

    A couple that haven't made the list yet...
    The Lady Vanishes
    Dial M for Murder
    Both have been remade/updated but not improved on.
     
  9. I quite enjoyed the re-make but you are right

    Not a patch on the original
     
  10. Hitchcock shot Dial M for Murder in 3D (there was a craze for it in the early 1950s). I wonder what the 3D version is like?
     
  11. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    For me the Birds was so scary..i remember watching it in the cinema and nearly jumping out of my seat with someof the bird attacks!
     
  12. ilovesooty

    ilovesooty Lead commenter

    My favourites are "Shadow of a Doubt" "Strangers on a Train" and "Suspicion".
     
  13. Oooh I forgot "Strangers on a train" - I love that one!

     
  14. What is everyone's favourite decade for Hitchcock movies?
    1930s? The 39 Steps, Sabotage, The Lady Vanishes
    1940s? Notorious, Spellbound, Rebecca
    1950s? Vertigo, Rear Window, North by Northwest
    1960s? Psycho, The Birds, Torn Curtain
    1970s? Frenzy
    Its a toughie - Watched Psycho last night so will go for 1960s


     
  15. I love Strangers on a Train and think Shadow of a Doubt is very good too, but Suspicion is one of the few Hitchcock's I've seen once and not felt a great desire to see again. Not sure quite why, maybe not that keen on Carry Grant's character. What do you like so much about it, I'd love to be won over?
     
  16. Am I the only ROPE fan then?
     
  17. I think James Stewart was always great, so I enjoyed his performance in Rope. Its also interesting for the very long takes, at least 10 minutes at a time totally uncut. Shows how well Hitchcock planned everything to be able to do that. I do likeCedric Hardwicke as well so its always nice to see him in a character part. It had a claustophobic feel as the action remains in the flat the whole time, (apart from the trailer where you see the dead guy in the park with his girlfriend before he is killed), so in tha tway its a bit similar to Dial M for Murder.
     
  18. ilovesooty

    ilovesooty Lead commenter

    I find "Suspicion" interesting from a psychological point of view. And the bit at the end when she thinks they're going over the cliff always has me on the edge of my seat. I think it's a simple idea done well. I think Joan Fontaine is an underrated actress too.

    Incidentally I find "Dial M for Murder" really unconvincing because it's so "staged". Ray Milland spends the film being...Ray Milland. I find him totally the same in every one of his films apart from "The Lost Weekend". In that he proved her really can act.
     
  19. ilovesooty

    ilovesooty Lead commenter

    I find "Suspicion" interesting from a psychological point of view. And the bit at the end when she thinks they're going over the cliff always has me on the edge of my seat. I think it's a simple idea done well. I think Joan Fontaine is an underrated actress too.

    Incidentally I find "Dial M for Murder" really unconvincing because it's so "staged". Ray Milland spends the film being...Ray Milland. I find him totally the same in every one of his films apart from "The Lost Weekend". In that he proved he really can act.
     
  20. If I had to pick one I think I'd pick rear Window. I've never seen psycho or The Birds because I'm too easily scared.

    Talking of Hitchcock, I really loved Marnie when i first saw it. Having seen it a few times since I've started to wonder though. As a teen / early 20s I loved Marnie, she was strong and independent and didn't need a man to look after her. Then later I realised that was supposed to because she'd been hurt by her mother's lover (am I remembering correctly?) so I started to wonder if Hitchcock thought any woman who didn't want a man to take care of her must have something wrong with her....
     

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